[Histonet] Re: Histonet Digest, Vol 30, Issue 35, re: formalin exposure

From:"SAFETY TRAINORLAB"

Hi, Formaldehyde is a carcinogen and is list a one of the top ten toxic
chemicals used in industry. It is proven to be a carcinogen in  humans
mainly GI and liver. It is also an Immuno, Neuro, Reproductive and
Respiratory toxin. Not to mention a skin sensitizer. Anyone using
formaldehyde should minimize there exposure to it and if possible eliminate
it completely. At our lab, we will be switching to a formalin substitute.
Adam
----- Original Message ----- 
From: 
To: 
Sent: Wednesday, May 24, 2006 8:47 AM
Subject: Histonet Digest, Vol 30, Issue 35


> Send Histonet mailing list submissions to
> histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>
> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
> histonet-request@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>
> You can reach the person managing the list at
> histonet-owner@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of Histonet digest..."
>
>
> Today's Topics:
>
>    1. Formalin on skin (Gudrun Lang)
>    2. (no subject) (Paul Cremers)
>    3. RE: Formalin on skin (Charles.Embrey)
>    4. Shirley on leave : 24 May 2006 (Wednesday) (Shirley PHUA)
>    5. Re: Formalin on skin (Bryan Llewellyn)
>    6. Re: Formalin on skin (Chris Pomajzl)
>    7. re:Hoechst staining... (Carl Hobbs)
>    8. Re: Formalin on skin (Jackie M O'Connor)
>    9. Fw: Source of Re: [Histonet] Incubation chamber (Jan Shivers)
>   10. GSH meeting (Shirley Powell)
>   11. Re: STAFF EVALUATIONS (Patti Loykasek)
>   12. Sealing Paraffin Blocks (kerry.l.crabb@gsk.com)
>   13. Re: Re: Fixatives (Patti Loykasek)
>   14. RE: DNA/RNA Extraction Kits for paraffinised tissues
>       (Makhijani, Nalini S)
>   15. Re: tyrosine hydroxylase staining?? (Adam Perry)
>   16. Re: Re: Fixatives (Katri Tuomala)
>   17. RE: Formalin on skin (Kemlo Rogerson)
>   18. RE: Formalin on skin (Kemlo Rogerson)
>   19. RE: Formalin on skin (Kemlo Rogerson)
>   20. RE: Hoechst staining method (Melanie Black)
>   21. RE: Re: Fixatives (Weems, Joyce)
>   22. cytochrome c oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase  (Denise Crowley)
>   23. RE: Sealing Paraffin Blocks (Horn, Hazel V)
>   24. RE: Re: Fixatives (Horn, Hazel V)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Tue, 23 May 2006 19:32:18 +0200
> From: "Gudrun Lang" 
> Subject: [Histonet] Formalin on skin
> To: "Histonetliste \(Histonetliste\)"
> 
> Message-ID: <000101c67e8e$d7693550$eeeea8c0@SERVER01>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> Hi,
> Today a labassistent asked me, what would happen to her skin, if formalin
> swallowed over her arm.
> I said, the formalin would harden the skin, but only on the surface. She
> should wash the arm with plenty of water, and there will reamain no
negative
> reaction. It would not be dangerous for her health.
>
> Do you agree with me? Is there a cancer-risk after short contact with
> formalin?
>
> Greetings
> Gudrun Lang
>
> Histolab
> Akh Linz
> Austria
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Tue, 23 May 2006 13:35:58 -0400
> From: "Paul Cremers" 
> Subject: [Histonet] (no subject)
> To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Message-ID: 
> Content-Type: text/plain; format="flowed"
>
>
>    Hello to all,
>
>    Is  there  anyone  looking  for  a  histotech  or  two.  My wife and I
>    are wanting to move to the Boulder or Fort Collins, Colorado area.  We
>    are  also  interested in Portland, Salem, Corvalis and Eugene, Oregon.
>    We  are  both  HT certified and are wanting to start somewhere between
>    mid-August and September 1.
>
>    Thanks,
>
>    Paul and Melissa Cremers
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Tue, 23 May 2006 12:56:15 -0500
> From: "Charles.Embrey" 
> Subject: RE: [Histonet] Formalin on skin
> To: , "Histonetliste \(Histonetliste\)"
> 
> Message-ID:
> 
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> You are 100% correct.  I have even reached a bare hand into formalin to
> pull out something before but washed with soap and water minutes after.
> I have not personally heard of formalin causing an increased risk of
> skin cancer however I am sure that there is a study somewhere that has
> probably associated some risk with L---O---N---G term exposure. Your
> labassistant should be perfectly safe.  Just don't drink it and keep it
> out of the eyes :)
>
> Charles Embrey Jr. PA(ASCP)
> www.greyrealm.com
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> [mailto:histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu] On Behalf Of Gudrun
> Lang
> Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2006 12:32 PM
> To: Histonetliste (Histonetliste)
> Subject: [Histonet] Formalin on skin
>
> Hi,
> Today a labassistent asked me, what would happen to her skin, if
> formalin
> swallowed over her arm.
> I said, the formalin would harden the skin, but only on the surface. She
> should wash the arm with plenty of water, and there will reamain no
> negative
> reaction. It would not be dangerous for her health.
>
> Do you agree with me? Is there a cancer-risk after short contact with
> formalin?
>
> Greetings
> Gudrun Lang
>
> Histolab
> Akh Linz
> Austria
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Histonet mailing list
> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Wed, 24 May 2006 02:11:23 +0800
> From: Shirley PHUA 
> Subject: [Histonet] Shirley on leave : 24 May 2006 (Wednesday)
> To: histonet 
> Message-ID:
> 
>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
>
> I will be out of the office from  24/05/2006 to 24/05/2006.
>
> I am away on 1 day leave.
>
>  I will return on 25/05/2006 (Thursday).
>
> Pathologists : I will process your requests when I return. Otherwise, if
> urgent, please contact Henry.
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Tue, 23 May 2006 12:12:39 -0700
> From: Bryan Llewellyn 
> Subject: Re: [Histonet] Formalin on skin
> To: Histonet 
> Message-ID: <001201c67e9c$dbefc680$130e4246@yourlk4rlmsu>
> Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset=iso-8859-1;
> reply-type=original
>
> Most of us old-timers have stuck our fingers in formalin or spilled it on
> ourselves on many occasions.  I have never heard of anyone developing a
> tumour from it, though.  It certainly doesn't appear to be common if it
does
> happen.  In Canada some years ago we had a government program assisting
> people to inject urea-formaldehyde resin into the walls of houses as a
> retrofit insulation system.  A few years later it was decided the formalin
> fumes given off were carcinogenic, so we had another program to remove it.
> That's about the only link to tumours I have heard of.
>
> One of the pathologists I used to work with many years ago was fond of
> quoting a paper he had once read which compared naso-pharyngeal tumour
rates
> among various groups.  Pathologists had a lower rate than other people.
He
> always put that down to the formalin fumes they breathed in all the time.
>
> The real identified problem with formalin and skin contact is dermatitis.
> It isn't universal, but some people do get it with repeated contact, and
> once you develop the sensitivity to it, it doesn't go away.  So wear
gloves.
>
> Bryan Llewellyn
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Charles.Embrey" 
> To: ; "Histonetliste (Histonetliste)"
> 
> Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2006 10:56 AM
> Subject: RE: [Histonet] Formalin on skin
>
>
> You are 100% correct.  I have even reached a bare hand into formalin to
> pull out something before but washed with soap and water minutes after.
> I have not personally heard of formalin causing an increased risk of
> skin cancer however I am sure that there is a study somewhere that has
> probably associated some risk with L---O---N---G term exposure. Your
> labassistant should be perfectly safe.  Just don't drink it and keep it
> out of the eyes :)
>
> Charles Embrey Jr. PA(ASCP)
> www.greyrealm.com
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> [mailto:histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu] On Behalf Of Gudrun
> Lang
> Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2006 12:32 PM
> To: Histonetliste (Histonetliste)
> Subject: [Histonet] Formalin on skin
>
> Hi,
> Today a labassistent asked me, what would happen to her skin, if
> formalin
> swallowed over her arm.
> I said, the formalin would harden the skin, but only on the surface. She
> should wash the arm with plenty of water, and there will reamain no
> negative
> reaction. It would not be dangerous for her health.
>
> Do you agree with me? Is there a cancer-risk after short contact with
> formalin?
>
> Greetings
> Gudrun Lang
>
> Histolab
> Akh Linz
> Austria
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Histonet mailing list
> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
> _______________________________________________
> Histonet mailing list
> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Tue, 23 May 2006 13:51:49 -0500
> From: "Chris Pomajzl" 
> Subject: Re: [Histonet] Formalin on skin
> To: "HISTONET" 
> Message-ID: <004301c67e99$f31fa030$26fca8c0@CSP>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> I would imagine that if someone had open wounds or breaks in the skin,
there
> could be acute problems. But chronic long-term problems are unlikely with
> such a brief incident.
>
> People drink formaldehyde (or at least used to, wasn't it a preservative
in
> beer many years ago??), they smoke it (I've heard of people dipping joints
> in formaldehyde for a stronger buzz, never tried it myself), and we
breathe
> it in the lab every day. I believe that the carcinogenic effects are due
to
> long-term exposure in laboratory animals. I am not aware of any studies
> involving human subjects.
>
> Hope this helps.
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Charles.Embrey" 
> To: ; "Histonetliste (Histonetliste)"
> 
> Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2006 12:56 PM
> Subject: RE: [Histonet] Formalin on skin
>
>
> You are 100% correct.  I have even reached a bare hand into formalin to
> pull out something before but washed with soap and water minutes after.
> I have not personally heard of formalin causing an increased risk of
> skin cancer however I am sure that there is a study somewhere that has
> probably associated some risk with L---O---N---G term exposure. Your
> labassistant should be perfectly safe.  Just don't drink it and keep it
> out of the eyes :)
>
> Charles Embrey Jr. PA(ASCP)
> www.greyrealm.com
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> [mailto:histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu] On Behalf Of Gudrun
> Lang
> Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2006 12:32 PM
> To: Histonetliste (Histonetliste)
> Subject: [Histonet] Formalin on skin
>
> Hi,
> Today a labassistent asked me, what would happen to her skin, if
> formalin
> swallowed over her arm.
> I said, the formalin would harden the skin, but only on the surface. She
> should wash the arm with plenty of water, and there will reamain no
> negative
> reaction. It would not be dangerous for her health.
>
> Do you agree with me? Is there a cancer-risk after short contact with
> formalin?
>
> Greetings
> Gudrun Lang
>
> Histolab
> Akh Linz
> Austria
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Histonet mailing list
> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
> _______________________________________________
> Histonet mailing list
> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 7
> Date: Tue, 23 May 2006 21:30:39 +0100
> From: "Carl Hobbs" 
> Subject: [Histonet] re:Hoechst staining...
> To: "Histonet" 
> Message-ID: 
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Of nuclei!
> Easy.....If you wish, check out this site for a protocol and images
> http://www.immunoportal.com/index.php
> Saves me fingers retyping ;-)
> It's a standard, tho'. No fancy stuff reqd. Lots of XPerienced people here
> to help, that I will always pay greatest respects to.
> Regards
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 8
> Date: Tue, 23 May 2006 15:32:56 -0500
> From: "Jackie M O'Connor" 
> Subject: Re: [Histonet] Formalin on skin
> To: "Chris Pomajzl" 
> Cc: HISTONET 
> Message-ID:
> 
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
>
> Formaldehyde was a common ingredient of shampoos, and I remember reading
> the ingredients (with horror) on a bottle of Mr. Bubble bubble bath for
> kids (like 25 years ago).    If you remember "Good Morning Vietnam" - they
> mentioned using formaldehyde to produce a better head on a glass of beer
> from the tap.
> I once worked with a pathologist who was allergic to formaldehyde.  When
> he did the gross, we had to rinse all the specimens in H20 before he could
> examine them - yeah, that was fun.
> Jackie O'
>
>
>
>
> "Chris Pomajzl" 
> Sent by: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> 05/23/2006 01:51 PM
>
> To
> "HISTONET" 
> cc
>
> Subject
> Re: [Histonet] Formalin on skin
>
>
>
>
>
>
> I would imagine that if someone had open wounds or breaks in the skin,
> there
> could be acute problems. But chronic long-term problems are unlikely with
> such a brief incident.
>
> People drink formaldehyde (or at least used to, wasn't it a preservative
> in
> beer many years ago??), they smoke it (I've heard of people dipping joints
> in formaldehyde for a stronger buzz, never tried it myself), and we
> breathe
> it in the lab every day. I believe that the carcinogenic effects are due
> to
> long-term exposure in laboratory animals. I am not aware of any studies
> involving human subjects.
>
> Hope this helps.
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Charles.Embrey" 
> To: ; "Histonetliste (Histonetliste)"
> 
> Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2006 12:56 PM
> Subject: RE: [Histonet] Formalin on skin
>
>
> You are 100% correct.  I have even reached a bare hand into formalin to
> pull out something before but washed with soap and water minutes after.
> I have not personally heard of formalin causing an increased risk of
> skin cancer however I am sure that there is a study somewhere that has
> probably associated some risk with L---O---N---G term exposure. Your
> labassistant should be perfectly safe.  Just don't drink it and keep it
> out of the eyes :)
>
> Charles Embrey Jr. PA(ASCP)
> www.greyrealm.com
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> [mailto:histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu] On Behalf Of Gudrun
> Lang
> Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2006 12:32 PM
> To: Histonetliste (Histonetliste)
> Subject: [Histonet] Formalin on skin
>
> Hi,
> Today a labassistent asked me, what would happen to her skin, if
> formalin
> swallowed over her arm.
> I said, the formalin would harden the skin, but only on the surface. She
> should wash the arm with plenty of water, and there will reamain no
> negative
> reaction. It would not be dangerous for her health.
>
> Do you agree with me? Is there a cancer-risk after short contact with
> formalin?
>
> Greetings
> Gudrun Lang
>
> Histolab
> Akh Linz
> Austria
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Histonet mailing list
> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
> _______________________________________________
> Histonet mailing list
> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Histonet mailing list
> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 9
> Date: Tue, 23 May 2006 16:55:27 -0500
> From: "Jan Shivers" 
> Subject: Fw: Source of Re: [Histonet] Incubation chamber
> To: "histonet" 
> Message-ID: <012801c67eb3$9a32e3f0$a1065486@auxs.umn.edu>
> Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
> reply-type=response
>
> Years ago when my IHC lab was a fledgling entity with very little budget,
I
> used a 9x13" metal cake pan (with lid), wet paper towels for humidity in
the
> bottom, and disposable 1 ml pipets as the slide racks.  They held two rows
> of 10 slides each.  Just had to make sure my wet paper towels laid flat
(no
> bubbles), otherwise they'd make the pipets sit uneven.
>
> Jan Shivers
> UMN VDL
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Gayle Callis" 
> To: "Geoff McAuliffe" ;
> 
> Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2006 10:21 AM
> Subject: Source of Re: [Histonet] Incubation chamber
>
>
> > Evergreen Scientific has a 10 slide chamber, plastic, with lid.  The
> > chamber is designed so slides are elevated, just add water to bottom of
> > wells for humidity.  There are 3 chambers per package, very inexpensive.
> > You can stack them.  They come either black plastic for fluorescence
work
> > OR clear.  I have seen them sold other places to, maybe EMS is the
place.
> > Evergreen makes them.
> >
> > Very tidy little devices for low volume work
> >
> > At 08:06 AM 5/23/2006, you wrote:
> >>I use "Tupperware", or a generic equivalent. Slides are supported by
glass
> >>rods in the bottom of the container. Add a little water and seal.
> >>
> >>Geoff
> >
> > Gayle Callis
> > MT,HT,HTL(ASCP)
> > Research Histopathology Supervisor
> > Veterinary Molecular Biology
> > Montana State University - Bozeman
> > PO Box 173610
> > Bozeman MT 59717-3610
> > 406 994-6367
> > 406 994-4303 (FAX)
> >
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > Histonet mailing list
> > Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> > http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
> >
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 10
> Date: Tue, 23 May 2006 18:00:28 -0400
> From: Shirley Powell 
> Subject: [Histonet] GSH meeting
> To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Message-ID: <01M2RQRHLNHW8WWEFM@Macon2.Mercer.edu>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
>
>  Reminder::::
>
>
> The Georgia Society for Histotechnology and the Georgia Society of
Cytology
> will hold their 4th Annual Combined Scientific Symposium on Saturday, June
> 3, 2006, in Augusta, Georgia at the Marriott Augusta Hotel and Suites, 2
> Tenth Street, Augusta, GA 30901.  The phone number for reservations is
1-706
> 722-8900.
>
> I will email you a program upon request.  I also have vendor information
for
> any who wish to exhibit.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Shirley Powell
> GSH Secretary/Membership Chair
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 11
> Date: Tue, 23 May 2006 15:39:28 -0700
> From: Patti Loykasek 
> Subject: Re: [Histonet] STAFF EVALUATIONS
> To: Diana McCaig , histonet
> 
> Message-ID: 
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
>
> Hi Diana. I would be interested in your sharing the info that you get
back.
> I can tell you what we do. I'll start off by saying we are constantly
> updating/revising our program. I feel like we do a better job each year.
> Some tasks are evaluated by observation & documented on a spreadsheet that
> contains all SOPs (by name) that a particular staff should know. I do have
> checklists for equipment that cover things from do staff know where on/off
> is, to the various functions of the equipment staff should know. For the
> histologists we evaluate H&E sections (both paraffin & FS) with criteria
> similar to the board registry & include some safety & clean up details.
I'm
> putting together a test to cover knowledge of general IHC & would like to
> get some photos of common stains acceptable & not for a test. A work in
> progress - always.
> Hope that helps a bit.
>
>
> Patti Loykasek BS, HTL, QIHC
> PhenoPath Laboratories
> Seattle, WA
>
>
>
>
> > Does anyone do an annual evaluation of staff ability to perform certain
tasks?
> > Diana McCaig  519-352-6401 (6604)
> > _______________________________________________
> > Histonet mailing list
> > Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> > http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> This e-mail message, including any attachments, is for the sole use of
> the intended recipients and may contain privileged information. Any
> unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If
> you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by e-mail
> and destroy all copies of the original message, or you may call PhenoPath
> Laboratories, Seattle, WA U.S.A. at (206) 374-9000.
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 12
> Date: Tue, 23 May 2006 18:45:19 -0400
> From: kerry.l.crabb@gsk.com
> Subject: [Histonet] Sealing Paraffin Blocks
> To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Message-ID:
> 
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> What is the current opinion and practice on sealing paraffin blocks prior
> to filing/archiving them?  What is the pro and con in your opinion?
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 13
> Date: Tue, 23 May 2006 15:46:19 -0700
> From: Patti Loykasek 
> Subject: Re: [Histonet] Re: Fixatives
> To: 
> Message-ID: 
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
>
> Dr. Richmond, I always appreciate your views and comments. I do think if a
> bottle comes to the lab with a label noting fixative it could be dictated
as
> "...received in container labeled ..." or ",,,received in unlabeled
> container..", this is what was done at previous facilities I have worked,
> but perhaps is not the norm.
> I do agree that the elephant in the room is how poor or improper
> fixation/processing affects everything downstream. I could go on & on
about
> this issue. I feel that CAP nor anyone else does very little to address
this
> issue. Everyone turns a bit of a blind eye to it.
> Thanks for the input.
>
>
> Patti Loykasek BS, HTL, QIHC
> PhenoPath Laboratories
> Seattle, WA
>
>
>
>
>
> > Patti Loykasek at PhenoPath Laboratories notes >>We are a reference lab
and
> > receive specimens from all over the USA. One of my "pet peeves" is that
it is
> > rare to see in the report exactly what type of fixative the specimen was
> > received in or subsequently processed in. I know we have no standard
form of
> > reporting, but it just seems like best practice to me to include this
> > information on
> > the report. One of my favorites is "...received in fixative..." - not
very
> > helpful.<<
> >
> > That's exactly the phrase I use in my gross descriptions, and for a very
good
> > reason. I'm not about to stick my nose into every specimen bottle to
verify
> > that it contains formalin and not alcohol, water, or pine-scented floor
> > disinfectant (used at one hospital I know as a "fixative" for
placentas). I'm
> > willing
> > to smell-test a very occasional container where I'm suspicious that the
wrong
> > fixative has been used, but not every time!
> >
> > Time of fixation is the dead horse in the middle of the living room
floor -
> > nobody wants to hear that the HER2 immunostain for breast cancer
requires
> > overnight fixation, for example.
> >
> > Bob Richmond
> > Gastonia NC
> > _______________________________________________
> > Histonet mailing list
> > Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> > http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> This e-mail message, including any attachments, is for the sole use of
> the intended recipients and may contain privileged information. Any
> unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If
> you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by e-mail
> and destroy all copies of the original message, or you may call PhenoPath
> Laboratories, Seattle, WA U.S.A. at (206) 374-9000.
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 14
> Date: Tue, 23 May 2006 17:09:02 -0700
> From: "Makhijani, Nalini S" 
> Subject: RE: [Histonet] DNA/RNA Extraction Kits for paraffinised
> tissues
> To: "Shirley PHUA" ,
> 
> Message-ID:
> <715FA772CEA81A47B1A762AB6E45123A0111B549@VHAV22MSGA3.v22.med.va.gov>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
>
> Ambion advertises a kit, "RecoverAll", for total RNA and DNA extraction
> from FFPE tissues.  I've never used it, but you could get more
> information from their web site: www.ambion.com/prod/recoverall.
> Hope this helps!
>
> Nalini Makhijani, M.S.
> Research Biologist
> VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> [mailto:histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu] On Behalf Of Shirley
> PHUA
> Sent: Monday, May 22, 2006 7:32 PM
> To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Subject: [Histonet] DNA/RNA Extraction Kits for paraffinised tissues
>
> Dear All
>
> Have anyone heard of any DNA/RNA extraction kits for formalin-fixed,
> paraffinised tissues? I will greatly appreciate if you can share some of
>
> your feedbacks. Were your yields good?
>
> Thanks in advance!
>
> Shirley Phua
> Histopathology Laboratory
> Centre for Forensic Medicine
> Health Sciences Authority
> DID : 62130654
> _______________________________________________
> Histonet mailing list
> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 15
> Date: Tue, 23 May 2006 17:17:35 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Adam Perry 
> Subject: Re: [Histonet] tyrosine hydroxylase staining??
> To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Message-ID: <20060524001735.22829.qmail@web30413.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
>
> Hey Johanna,
>
>  Just curious...when you say you get weak, diffuse staining all over the
brain, is that in sections that should contain dopaminergic cell bodies
(like in the midbrain, hypothalamus, etc.) or in areas where you would
mostly see diffuse fiber staining (like in the striatum)?  Because I've
started staining for TH in rodent brain and the staining pattern in the
striatum is diffuse (i.e. the whole striatum is darker than the surrounding
cortex, but nothing like cell bodies...because it's mostly terminal
projections- correct me if I'm wrong, but I wouldn't expect to see many/any
cell bodies labeled with TH in the striatum), whereas it clearly picks up
cell bodies in regions that contain dopamine producing neurons.
>
>  So if you were only staining rostral forebrain sections (like the
striatum), I don't know if you should expect to see cell bodies, just
diffuse fibers.  If you're not already doing it, maybe you should include
more caudal sections in your IHC (sections containing the arcuate nucleus or
ventral tegmental area, etc. would be great)...that way you'd know if you're
detecting cells in those areas and the weak staining in striatum could be
fibers that just need amplification?  Sorry if I'm misinterpreting your post
about the weak staining...but it would be an easy thing to overlook if you
didn't have sections with cell bodies in them...
>
>  Finally, I've only used a sheep anti-TH IgG from Novus Biological and it
worked beautifully on the first time in a non-traditional rodent species
(1:1,000 with fluorescence, so I imagine even more dilute concentrations
should work with enzyme-mediated chromagen detection)...so I agree with
Geoff McAuliffe that getting good results with TH should be easy...
>
>  If you're interested I can email you my protocol, it's not too different
from what you described....but what detection system are you using?
Fluorescence, DAB, other?  Because you didn't mention any pretreatments like
HRP inactivation or quenching unreacted aldehydes...maybe if you give more
particulars to your methods, others could provide more tips?
>
>
>   Good luck with the trouble shooting,
>  Adam
>
> Geoff McAuliffe  wrote: Hi Johanna:
>
>     Your proceedure sounds fine to me. I have never used the antibody in
> question but getting good results with TH should be VERY easy. I use a
> polyclonal TH from Pel-Freez in Rogers, AK, works great on both mouse
> and rat brains. Assuming the brains were not overfixed (24 hours could
> be too long)  and the antibody is still good I would make sure all of my
> solutions were properly labeled. Also, is your detection system OK? You
> could have great binding but if the detection system is not working
> properly you will never know it.
>
> Geoff
>
> Jackson, Johanna wrote:
>
> >Dear All,
> >
> >I am trying to stain dopaminergic neurons in the striatum of the adult
rat brain which has been perfused with 4% PFA, washed and then cryoprotected
in 20% sucrose, before being sectioned (10um) on a cryostat. I pretreat the
sections with 0.1% Triton-X and block using serum.   I am using the
monoclonal anti-tyrosine hydroxylase antibody from Sigma (T1299).  Sigma
recommend a working concentration of 1:2000 however I have had no luck with
this staining.  I just a weak staining all over the brain with no
specificity in the striatum.
> >
> >Does anyone have a protocol using this particular antibody? I have seen
protocols with anti-TH from other companies which follow a similar method to
what I have described above, however they do not seem to work for the Sigma
antibody.
> >
> >Any help would be greatly appreciated!
> >
> >Thanks!
> >
> >Jo
> >
> >
> >Stem Cell Imaging
> >MRC Clinical Sciences Centre
> >Imperial College London
> >Hammersmith Hospital Campus
> >Du Cane Road
> >London
> >W12 0NN
> >0208 3833796
> >_______________________________________________
> >Histonet mailing list
> >Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> >http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
> >
> >
> >
>
>
> -- 
> --
> **********************************************
> Geoff McAuliffe, Ph.D.
> Neuroscience and Cell Biology
> Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
> 675 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854
> voice: (732)-235-4583; fax: -4029
> mcauliff@umdnj.edu
> **********************************************
>
> _______________________________________________
> Histonet mailing list
> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
>
> ---------------------------------
> Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. PC-to-Phone calls for ridiculously low rates.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 16
> Date: Tue, 23 May 2006 23:01:54 -0400
> From: "Katri Tuomala" 
> Subject: Re: [Histonet] Re: Fixatives
> To: 
> Message-ID: <006e01c67ede$69e28450$6a9a9618@Katri>
> Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
> reply-type=original
>
> I have always read with respect Dr. Richmond's opinions, but here I have
to
> disagree.
>
> Surely the bottle, that the specimen comes in, is labelled with what ever
> the fixative is, along with the pertinent patient information. It should
be
> just as simple to say " specimen received in formalin (Bouins, Zenkers
> etc.)". There is no need and it is not advisable to smell it.
>
> It is an interesting mindset among many, not all, pathologist to insist in
> processing all tissues the same day (TAT!) ending up with inadequately
fixed
> and consequently poorly processed tissue, which we technologist then have
to
> struggle to produce well stained, wrinkle free, representative sections.
As
> an immuno tech I can testify for even bigger problems in producing
reliable
> results with immunohistochemical procedures.
>
> For purposes of immunostaining, it is important to know the time of
fixation
> in formalin, adequate or not (24 hours is considered adequate, not 4 or
even
> 8), so that we know what we are faced with and sometimes method can be
> adjusted to fit the fixation time. I would prefer doing immuno stains on a
> specimen, that is "overfixed" in formalin rather than underfixed.
>
> If I ever ended up with breast cancer, I would make sure, that at least
one
> tumor section got fixed 24 hours.
>
> This is my Tuesday Rant!
>
> Katri
> Katri Tuomala
> Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
>
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: 
> To: 
> Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2006 4:22 AM
> Subject: [Histonet] Re: Fixatives
>
>
> > Patti Loykasek at PhenoPath Laboratories notes >>We are a reference lab
> > and
> > receive specimens from all over the USA. One of my "pet peeves" is that
it
> > is
> > rare to see in the report exactly what type of fixative the specimen was
> > received in or subsequently processed in. I know we have no standard
form
> > of
> > reporting, but it just seems like best practice to me to include this
> > information on
> > the report. One of my favorites is "...received in fixative..." - not
very
> > helpful.<<
> >
> > That's exactly the phrase I use in my gross descriptions, and for a very
> > good
> > reason. I'm not about to stick my nose into every specimen bottle to
> > verify
> > that it contains formalin and not alcohol, water, or pine-scented floor
> > disinfectant (used at one hospital I know as a "fixative" for
placentas).
> > I'm willing
> > to smell-test a very occasional container where I'm suspicious that the
> > wrong
> > fixative has been used, but not every time!
> >
> > Time of fixation is the dead horse in the middle of the living room
> > floor -
> > nobody wants to hear that the HER2 immunostain for breast cancer
requires
> > overnight fixation, for example.
> >
> > Bob Richmond
> > Gastonia NC
> > _______________________________________________
> > Histonet mailing list
> > Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> > http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 17
> Date: Wed, 24 May 2006 08:01:59 +0100
> From: Kemlo Rogerson 
> Subject: RE: [Histonet] Formalin on skin
> To: "'Jackie M O'Connor'" , Chris Pomajzl
> 
> Cc: HISTONET 
> Message-ID:
> 
> Content-Type: text/plain
>
> Interestingly fish medication contains malachite green and formalin to
cure
> ulcers and to kill parasites; though oddly I think they are caused by the
> same thing. Fish harbor aeromonas and under extremes succumb to ulcers; on
> recovery invariably flagellated protozoa infest the wound and keep it
> 'open', the fish waterlogs.
>
> Formalin kills these parasites but not as well as metronidazole; though
> getting the medicine can be embarrassing. Have I gone off piste?
>
> Kemlo Rogerson
> Pathology Manager
> Ext  3311
> DD   01934 647057
> Mob 07749 754194
>
> Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. --W.
B.
> Yeats
>
>
>
>
> This e-mail is confidential and privileged. If you are not the intended
> recipient please accept my apologies; please do not disclose, copy or
> distribute information in this e-mail or take any action in reliance on
its
> contents: to do so is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. Please
inform
> me that this message has gone astray before deleting it. Thank you for
your
> co-operation
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 18
> Date: Wed, 24 May 2006 08:06:24 +0100
> From: Kemlo Rogerson 
> Subject: RE: [Histonet] Formalin on skin
> To: "'Bryan Llewellyn'" , Histonet
> 
> Message-ID:
> 
> Content-Type: text/plain
>
> Whilst I accept your premise that the mutagenic properties of formalin is
> low; anything that causes cell death, and formalin certainly does that,
> increases the mitotic activity of replacement cells and thereby increases
> the risk of an abnormality.
>
> Personally I have excluded pregnant woman from the presence of formalin
and
> try to have zero tolerance for trying to fix my Staff in its fumes by
using
> extraction, monitoring and protective gloves, etc.
>
> Kemlo Rogerson
> Pathology Manager
> Ext  3311
> DD   01934 647057
> Mob 07749 754194
>
> Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. --W.
B.
> Yeats
>
>
>
>
> This e-mail is confidential and privileged. If you are not the intended
> recipient please accept my apologies; please do not disclose, copy or
> distribute information in this e-mail or take any action in reliance on
its
> contents: to do so is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. Please
inform
> me that this message has gone astray before deleting it. Thank you for
your
> co-operation
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 19
> Date: Wed, 24 May 2006 08:09:43 +0100
> From: Kemlo Rogerson 
> Subject: RE: [Histonet] Formalin on skin
> To: "'gu.lang@gmx.at'" , "Histonetliste
> (Histonetliste)" 
> Message-ID:
> 
> Content-Type: text/plain
>
> Maybe it's not the physical drenching of the skin and the effects on that
> you should worry about but the fact that formalin is now on a larger warm
> surface area and the known dangers of formalin inhalation on the lung;
best
> not to experiment on Staff IMHO.
>
> Kemlo Rogerson
> Pathology Manager
> Ext  3311
> DD   01934 647057
> Mob 07749 754194
>
> This e-mail is confidential and privileged. If you are not the intended
> recipient please accept my apologies; please do not disclose, copy or
> distribute information in this e-mail or take any action in reliance on
its
> contents: to do so is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. Please
inform
> me that this message has gone astray before deleting it. Thank you for
your
> co-operation
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 20
> Date: Wed, 24 May 2006 11:39:19 +0200
> From: Melanie Black 
> Subject: [Histonet] RE: Hoechst staining method
> To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Message-ID: 
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" ; format="flowed"
>
> Hi Tracey
>
> Some years ago, I looked into fluorescent nuclear counterstains,
> including dapi, propidium iodide and HOECHST. Heochst is also known
> as bisBenzimide.
>
> Method:
> Mix 1mg bisBemzimide (Sigma B2883) with 1ml Dist water. Take 4.0
> micro litres of this stock and dilute with 1ml PBS pH 7.4.Apply to
> sections for 10 mins, wash 3 x in PBS. Fluorescence is bright blue,
> viewed with a UV filter 340 nm.
>
> Stain reference:
> Latt,SA and Stetten GJ. Histochem. Cytochem 24,24 (1976)
> Araki, T et al, Histochem. 87,331 (1987)
>
> Regards
> Melanie Black
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Hi,
> We are doing an immunofluorescence research project for podocytes.
> The urine cytospins are to be counterstained with Hoescht.  We have
> never used it - can someone recommend a concentration, diluent and
> staining time that we could start with. Thanks in advance.
>
> Tracey
>
> -- 
> Cardiovascular Research Unit
> Div. of Cardiothoracic Surgery
> Chris Barnard Building
> University of Cape Town
> Anzio Road
> Observatory
> 7925
> Republic of South Africa
>
> Tel +27 21 406-6589
> Cel +27 82 469-3352
> Fax +27 21 448-5935
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 21
> Date: Wed, 24 May 2006 07:17:18 -0400
> From: "Weems, Joyce" 
> Subject: RE: [Histonet] Re: Fixatives
> To: "Katri Tuomala" ,
> 
> Message-ID:
> <1CD6831EB9B26D45B0A3EAA79F7EBD320263E103@sjhaexc02.sjha.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain;  charset="utf-8"
>
> "Surely the bottle, that the specimen comes in, is labelled with what ever
> the fixative is, along with the pertinent patient information. It should
be
> just as simple to say " specimen received in formalin (Bouins, Zenkers
> etc.)". There is no need and it is not advisable to smell it."
>
>    If this statement were true,  there would be no question. However, not
>    everyone uses prefilled containers, and the labeling is not always
ideal. I'm
>    sure this is the situation to which Dr. Bob refers...j
>
> Joyce Weems
> Pathology Manager
> Saint Joseph's Hospital of Atlanta
> 404-851-7376
> 404-851-7831 - Fax
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu on behalf of Katri Tuomala
> Sent: Tue 5/23/2006 11:01 PM
> To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Subject: Re: [Histonet] Re: Fixatives
>
> I have always read with respect Dr. Richmond's opinions, but here I have
to
> disagree.
>
> Surely the bottle, that the specimen comes in, is labelled with what ever
> the fixative is, along with the pertinent patient information. It should
be
> just as simple to say " specimen received in formalin (Bouins, Zenkers
> etc.)". There is no need and it is not advisable to smell it.
>
> It is an interesting mindset among many, not all, pathologist to insist in
> processing all tissues the same day (TAT!) ending up with inadequately
fixed
> and consequently poorly processed tissue, which we technologist then have
to
> struggle to produce well stained, wrinkle free, representative sections.
As
> an immuno tech I can testify for even bigger problems in producing
reliable
> results with immunohistochemical procedures.
>
> For purposes of immunostaining, it is important to know the time of
fixation
> in formalin, adequate or not (24 hours is considered adequate, not 4 or
even
> 8), so that we know what we are faced with and sometimes method can be
> adjusted to fit the fixation time. I would prefer doing immuno stains on a
> specimen, that is "overfixed" in formalin rather than underfixed.
>
> If I ever ended up with breast cancer, I would make sure, that at least
one
> tumor section got fixed 24 hours.
>
> This is my Tuesday Rant!
>
> Katri
> Katri Tuomala
> Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
>
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: 
> To: 
> Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2006 4:22 AM
> Subject: [Histonet] Re: Fixatives
>
>
> > Patti Loykasek at PhenoPath Laboratories notes >>We are a reference lab
> > and
> > receive specimens from all over the USA. One of my "pet peeves" is that
it
> > is
> > rare to see in the report exactly what type of fixative the specimen was
> > received in or subsequently processed in. I know we have no standard
form
> > of
> > reporting, but it just seems like best practice to me to include this
> > information on
> > the report. One of my favorites is "...received in fixative..." - not
very
> > helpful.<<
> >
> > That's exactly the phrase I use in my gross descriptions, and for a very
> > good
> > reason. I'm not about to stick my nose into every specimen bottle to
> > verify
> > that it contains formalin and not alcohol, water, or pine-scented floor
> > disinfectant (used at one hospital I know as a "fixative" for
placentas).
> > I'm willing
> > to smell-test a very occasional container where I'm suspicious that the
> > wrong
> > fixative has been used, but not every time!
> >
> > Time of fixation is the dead horse in the middle of the living room
> > floor -
> > nobody wants to hear that the HER2 immunostain for breast cancer
requires
> > overnight fixation, for example.
> >
> > Bob Richmond
> > Gastonia NC
> > _______________________________________________
> > Histonet mailing list
> > Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> > http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Histonet mailing list
> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
>
> Confidentiality Notice ** The information contained in this message may be
privileged and is confidential information intended for the use of the
addressee listed above. If you are neither the intended recipient nor the
employee or agent responsible for delivering this message to the intended
recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying,
distribution or the taking of any action in reliance on the contents of this
information is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication
in error, please notify us immediately by replying to the message and
deleting it from your computer. Thank you. Saint Joseph's Health System,
Inc.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 22
> Date: Wed, 24 May 2006 08:20:53 -0400
> From: Denise Crowley 
> Subject: [Histonet] cytochrome c oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase
> To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Message-ID: <5CE60D25-D94D-4942-8080-49E931647809@mit.edu>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed
>
> I have been asked to perform these enzyme stains on murine heart.
> Since this is new to me, I'm asking the experts for any favorite
> protocols. Even better, any commercially available kits.
>
> I also have a question about the frozen sectioning.  In the clinical
> setting, we always froze the muscle biopsy without OCT.  Is there a
> good reason for this?  I think that filling the heart with diluted
> OCT will produce a nicer looking section, but I don't want to
> compromise the staining.
>
> Denise Crowley
> Facility Manager Histology
> Center for Cancer Research
> Massachusetts Institute of Technology
> 40 Ames St. E17-230
> Cambridge MA  02139
> 617-258-8183
> dencrowl@mit.edu
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 23
> Date: Wed, 24 May 2006 08:36:22 -0500
> From: "Horn, Hazel V" 
> Subject: RE: [Histonet] Sealing Paraffin Blocks
> To: kerry.l.crabb@gsk.com, histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Message-ID:
> <9AE8AA9E1F644B4AA6C155FB6FD51C63038BE0A3@EMAIL.archildrens.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> We used to do this years ago.  We no longer seal blocks.   In fact, I
> believe you cut away more on a sealed block if the block requires
> recutting.
>
> Hazel Horn
> Hazel Horn, HT/HTL (ASCP)
> Supervisor of Histology
> Arkansas Children's Hospital
> 800 Marshall    Slot 820
> Little Rock, AR   72202
>
> phone   501.364.4240
> fax        501.364.3912
>
> visit us on the web at:    www.archildrens.org
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> [mailto:histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu] On Behalf Of
> kerry.l.crabb@gsk.com
> Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2006 5:45 PM
> To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Subject: [Histonet] Sealing Paraffin Blocks
>
> What is the current opinion and practice on sealing paraffin blocks
> prior
> to filing/archiving them?  What is the pro and con in your opinion?
> _______________________________________________
> Histonet mailing list
> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
> The information contained in this message may be privileged and
confidential and protected from disclosure. If the reader of this message is
not the intended recipient, or an employee or agent responsible for
delivering this message to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified
that any dissemination, distribution or copying of this communication is
strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error,
please notify us immediately by replying to the message and deleting it from
your computer. Thank you.
>
============================================================================
==
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 24
> Date: Wed, 24 May 2006 08:40:38 -0500
> From: "Horn, Hazel V" 
> Subject: RE: [Histonet] Re: Fixatives
> To: "Weems, Joyce" , "Katri Tuomala"
> , histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Message-ID:
> <9AE8AA9E1F644B4AA6C155FB6FD51C63038BE0A4@EMAIL.archildrens.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> And not all bottles say exactly what the formalin fixative is.   Some
> labels are just a formalin warning label.  Our fixative is Zinc buffered
> formalin.  Most would probably assume the label was for 10% NBF when in
> fact it is not.   We use ARUP Labs for a few tests we do not do and
> their requisition asks what fixative was used.
>
> Hazel Horn
> Hazel Horn, HT/HTL (ASCP)
> Supervisor of Histology
> Arkansas Children's Hospital
> 800 Marshall    Slot 820
> Little Rock, AR   72202
>
> phone   501.364.4240
> fax        501.364.3912
>
> visit us on the web at:    www.archildrens.org
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> [mailto:histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu] On Behalf Of Weems,
> Joyce
> Sent: Wednesday, May 24, 2006 6:17 AM
> To: Katri Tuomala; histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Subject: RE: [Histonet] Re: Fixatives
>
> "Surely the bottle, that the specimen comes in, is labelled with what
> ever
> the fixative is, along with the pertinent patient information. It should
> be
> just as simple to say " specimen received in formalin (Bouins, Zenkers
> etc.)". There is no need and it is not advisable to smell it."
>
>    If this statement were true,  there would be no question. However,
> not
>    everyone uses prefilled containers, and the labeling is not always
> ideal. I'm
>    sure this is the situation to which Dr. Bob refers...j
>
> Joyce Weems
> Pathology Manager
> Saint Joseph's Hospital of Atlanta
> 404-851-7376
> 404-851-7831 - Fax
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu on behalf of Katri
> Tuomala
> Sent: Tue 5/23/2006 11:01 PM
> To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Subject: Re: [Histonet] Re: Fixatives
>
> I have always read with respect Dr. Richmond's opinions, but here I have
> to
> disagree.
>
> Surely the bottle, that the specimen comes in, is labelled with what
> ever
> the fixative is, along with the pertinent patient information. It should
> be
> just as simple to say " specimen received in formalin (Bouins, Zenkers
> etc.)". There is no need and it is not advisable to smell it.
>
> It is an interesting mindset among many, not all, pathologist to insist
> in
> processing all tissues the same day (TAT!) ending up with inadequately
> fixed
> and consequently poorly processed tissue, which we technologist then
> have to
> struggle to produce well stained, wrinkle free, representative sections.
> As
> an immuno tech I can testify for even bigger problems in producing
> reliable
> results with immunohistochemical procedures.
>
> For purposes of immunostaining, it is important to know the time of
> fixation
> in formalin, adequate or not (24 hours is considered adequate, not 4 or
> even
> 8), so that we know what we are faced with and sometimes method can be
> adjusted to fit the fixation time. I would prefer doing immuno stains on
> a
> specimen, that is "overfixed" in formalin rather than underfixed.
>
> If I ever ended up with breast cancer, I would make sure, that at least
> one
> tumor section got fixed 24 hours.
>
> This is my Tuesday Rant!
>
> Katri
> Katri Tuomala
> Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
>
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: 
> To: 
> Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2006 4:22 AM
> Subject: [Histonet] Re: Fixatives
>
>
> > Patti Loykasek at PhenoPath Laboratories notes >>We are a reference
> lab
> > and
> > receive specimens from all over the USA. One of my "pet peeves" is
> that it
> > is
> > rare to see in the report exactly what type of fixative the specimen
> was
> > received in or subsequently processed in. I know we have no standard
> form
> > of
> > reporting, but it just seems like best practice to me to include this
> > information on
> > the report. One of my favorites is "...received in fixative..." - not
> very
> > helpful.<<
> >
> > That's exactly the phrase I use in my gross descriptions, and for a
> very
> > good
> > reason. I'm not about to stick my nose into every specimen bottle to
> > verify
> > that it contains formalin and not alcohol, water, or pine-scented
> floor
> > disinfectant (used at one hospital I know as a "fixative" for
> placentas).
> > I'm willing
> > to smell-test a very occasional container where I'm suspicious that
> the
> > wrong
> > fixative has been used, but not every time!
> >
> > Time of fixation is the dead horse in the middle of the living room
> > floor -
> > nobody wants to hear that the HER2 immunostain for breast cancer
> requires
> > overnight fixation, for example.
> >
> > Bob Richmond
> > Gastonia NC
> > _______________________________________________
> > Histonet mailing list
> > Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> > http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Histonet mailing list
> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
>
> Confidentiality Notice ** The information contained in this message may
> be privileged and is confidential information intended for the use of
> the addressee listed above. If you are neither the intended recipient
> nor the employee or agent responsible for delivering this message to the
> intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure,
> copying, distribution or the taking of any action in reliance on the
> contents of this information is strictly prohibited. If you have
> received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by
> replying to the message and deleting it from your computer. Thank you.
> Saint Joseph's Health System, Inc.
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
> The information contained in this message may be privileged and
confidential and protected from disclosure. If the reader of this message is
not the intended recipient, or an employee or agent responsible for
delivering this message to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified
that any dissemination, distribution or copying of this communication is
strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error,
please notify us immediately by replying to the message and deleting it from
your computer. Thank you.
>
============================================================================
==
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
> Histonet mailing list
> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
> End of Histonet Digest, Vol 30, Issue 35
> ****************************************
>

_______________________________________________
Histonet mailing list
Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet


<< Previous Message | Next Message >>