RE: [Histonet] (no subject)

From:"Barry R Rittman"


Welcome or as Charlotte would have said salutations.
The time of fixation in formalin should not be the problem with this
staining unless the fixative was or became acidic with possible loss of
mineral and other components.
The major problem with staining whole embryos is adequate penetration of
the stain. This is often slowed down by lipid left in the tissues or
insufficient time in the staining solutions.
Would you let us know the precise procedure that you used please?
Thanks and have a great weekend.
Barry

-----Original Message-----
From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
[mailto:histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu] On Behalf Of
awall@unmc.edu
Sent: Thursday, May 20, 2004 1:19 PM
To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Subject: [Histonet] (no subject)

Hello People,
    This is my first posting.  I am currently in the process of staining
bone and cartilage of newly born mice.  I am using Alizarin Red S for
the bones and Alcian Blue for the cartilage.  I eviscerate as much of
the skin and muscle tissue as I can.  The problem is I am not getting
the cartilage and the bone to stain correctly.  I received these samples
from another lab and found out they had been fixed and stored @ 4
degrees in the same paraformaldehyde for more than a year.  The bone
stains bluish green and the cartilage does not stain at all.  Any
suggestion would be a big help and I have plenty of specimens to work
with so I will take what I can get. Thank you for your time, Drew
University of Nebraska Medical Center


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