Re: [Histonet] potential HIPPA issue, would like your opinion

From:"Victoria Baker"


I've worked with these logs as well and I understand where Compliance
is coming from and the way we had worked it was that::
- all specimens that are delivered to the lab have to be
counter-signed by someone on the histology staff - this way we could
be sure that we had everything and there were no reasons for us to
reject the specimen for any reason
- other than the patients name, no Unique Identifiers (SSN/Med.Rec#,
DOB) are on the log.
- log sheets are filed at the end of the day with any path req forms
and kept for only 90 days and then destroyed in the 'confidential'
disposal bin - ie. shredded

If your lab staff has to do any pick ups at the OR or SDS or even the
general refrigerator for weekend or after hours pick up they are also
required to initial a log that usually has the patient "sticker"
attached to the page with ALL  the HIPPA regulated information
included.  The Compliance Department must have some sort of policy
with them on how they handle this.  All of these departments are
considered controlled environments with access to these logs limited
to only staff able to see any of this so there should be a universal
hospital policy in place to cover this.

Hope this helps.


On 3/5/08, Della Speranza, Vinnie  wrote:
> Couriers delivering surgical or biopsy samples to our laboratory are asked to log in each sample they are delivering in a written record contained on a clipboard at the pathology receiving window at our facility. This occurs before any pathology staff actually accession the specimen and allows for an independent record completed by the courier of exactly what was delivered.
> An individual has contacted our Compliance office out of concern that because the record includes the patient's name, as well as other info including specimen, date, name of courier, etc, this information would be seen by subsequent couriers logging into this record.
> The record I'm referring to has on occasion assisted us in investigating when a clinician is looking for a report and we discover that the specimen was not received. Between our record and those maintained in the OR, for example, we can piece together the circumstances if need be.
> I hope that some of you will share the process you use, especially if your procedure might be more effective in maintaining the privacy of the patient.
> Vinnie Della Speranza
> Manager for Anatomic Pathology Services
> Medical University of South Carolina
> 165 Ashley Avenue Suite 309
> Charleston, South Carolina 29425
> Ph: (843) 792-6353
> Fax: (843) 792-8974
> _______________________________________________
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