Re: ? about Histologist work and Article Authorship

From:Lesley Weston

Re: ? about Histologist work and Article Authorship My ex-boss (I took early retirement when the grant disappeared) also worked on this system. The problem was that he was the sole arbiter as to who had provided what input. My name did appear on a few papers as an author, but mostly I was acknowledged at the end, even when I had developed the protocols from scratch. But this is all in the past, and I stand by my assertion that working in a research lab is much more fun than working in a hospital lab.

Lesley Weston.

on 10/03/2003 7:23 AM, Phillip Huff at wrote:

I find it unfortunate and strange that the primary researcher on your project would not give you some sort of authorship credit for your work on the project you mentioned. The general rule that we follow in our lab is that if anyone had some degree of contribution to the research work, they are given an authorship on the paper, generally 3rd to second last author. The person who wrote the paper gets first author, the person who did the majority of the lab work gets second author, and the primary research scientist get last author. This can get tedious for some research projects, but it ensures that people get credit for the work they do.
For our Canadian lab and most of those I know of in N. America, this rule is generally followed. In a lab in Germany where I worked, however, the technicians (who do 99% of the lab work) are given an acknowledgment at the end of the manuscript, based on the premise that they did not contribute to any of the actual 'writing'. I don't agree with it, but most technicians either do not want to write manuscripts, or are never given the opportunity to write, due to their work load. I would talk to your primary researcher about getting some sort of credit in a manscript for your work.

Lesley Weston wrote:
You forgot the bit about how, after you have solved all the problems and
produced a smoothly-working protocol to do something no-one has even tried
to do before, the project is taken away from you and given to a graduate
student. The papers resulting from your ideas and work are then published
bearing the student's name, but not yours. Even so, it's a lot more fun than
routine hospital work.

Lesley Weston.

on 08/03/2003 7:13 AM, Morken, Tim at wrote:

A research histologist is one who has to work at 110 percent to make up for
the deficiencies of the person who gives them tissue without ever taliking
to the histologist before hand to find out how best to treat and process
said tissue. don't feel bad - research is all about figuring out how to do
something no one has done before, and often things that logically can't be
done - often by researchers who have no clue how to do the work themselves.
And projects can take years - I have been working for 18 months on a project
and all we have done is figured out the best way to maintain and treat
tissue explants for best results - we have not really started the main work

Tim Morken

-----Original Message-----
To: HistoNet@pathology <>
Sent: 3/7/2003 3:45 PM
Subject: ? about Histologist work

Ok here goes;
What is the difference between a Histologist and a Research Histologist?
First I have been trained in histology including my AA Degree from a
recognized approved college, for the field of Histology.I am board
certified, ASCP since 1996.
I have in the past work in Histology at two local Hospitals.
With routine work, microtoming paraffin sections, also fresh frozen. All
tissue from Human Hospital surgeries.

I now have a job in research . I have been working here now for 3.5 yrs
. I
cut a lot of skin, brains,ear tissue, from different rodents also cut
brain sections and Hearts from Swine pigs and NHP. I also cut up to and
over 1,000 slides on a given protocol ( several rodents)
I also cut multiple sections of brain 8 slides on on block.
I have cut up to 10 slides on mouse ears. (serial sections).
I have even received awa
rds for outstanding histology slides I have cut.
I also am involved with per fusions of rodents.
Now with this type of work I am I a research Histologist?
I work for many doctors here in research.
I have one doctor that is for some reason not happy all of a sudden with
the brains I cut for him. He feels he need to teach me to be a research
He even came and picked his blocks up , he tried to cut them and he
do any better then me.
But yet again he wants to teach me to be a research histologist.

I am I missing something here.
I have been in the field since 1996.
Does anyone know the difference on how I will microtome different being
research histologist?
Thank you
Sandi Miller HT

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