RE: CJD Question.

<< Previous Message | Next Message >>
From:Emma Carter <E.Carter@OxfordBioMedica.co.uk>
To:Histonet@pathology.swmed.edu
Reply-To:
Content-Type:text/plain

Surely with known infectious material, you are, in a strange sort of way
actually safer.....at least you know what you have. if you are sectioning
unknowns, the risk is still there, but there is a possibility that because
there is not a positive diagnosis, then one may end up being slightly more
'relaxed' with safety issues.

If one wears gloves, and takes the appropriate care when cutting frozen
material _of any kind_ then, as fair as i am concerned anyway, i have taken
the appropriate steps to minimise risk.

As a professional, i feel i would owe it to my patienst, whoever they are,
and despite whatever misfortune may have befallen then, (and lets face it,
an individual to who _no_ misfortune as happened, would not have their
tissues in a histo lab) to treat them with dignity and understanding. The
fact that one does not know the patient, and will probably never meet is not
an issue. Every body deserves a fair trial. Being infected with HIV/CJD/Hep
B or whetever is not any bodies fault ( before i get yelled at, there have
been, i knw, some cases of people deliberately trying to get HIV, but this
ia a rare event...) and so the patient does not deserve to be judged.

Sorry if this is a bit ranty and long winded, but i am very cross.

emma carter


> -----Original Message-----
> From:	Medilex123@aol.com [SMTP:Medilex123@aol.com]
> Sent:	Tuesday, March 14, 2000 4:46 PM
> To:	JohnsoM@shmc.org; Histonet@pathology.swmed.edu
> Subject:	Re: CJD Question.
> 
> Micky,
> We won't perform fresh frozen sectioning on any material which is believed
> to  come from a patient with a 'serious' infection (TB/HIV/CJD/HepB to
> name but  four) It may be a little 'over the top' but, considering at that
> least 2  infective agents (HIV, CJD) have no treatment regimens which
> elicit a cure, it seems sensible not to perform FS on ?infective/known
> infective cases at all. I'm sure that if a a colleague contracted an
> infection as a result of 
> performing an FS on a known infective (or ?infective ) specimen we would
> have trouble justifying the procedure in front of a Court.
> 
> Hope this helps
> 
> Glyn Woodward
> City Hospital, Birmingham UK



<< Previous Message | Next Message >>