RE: Water, bRandy Glass? or a water tumbler and Arthur Frank of G lasgow.

From:"McCormick, James"

All, I've been around for quite a while and never entered a discussion of
malt,and particularly with highlanders, with the exception of "Maltoma".  My
first serious introduction to malt liquor  was in Glasgow as Arthur Frank (
optician and antique microscope collector ) poured a few fingers in a
tumbler from a bottle always stowed in his bottom desk drawer. We did not
sip,sniff,savour,or swirl. we drank the stuff down...straight away. No
discussion of water or fancy glassware. Straight away and down. And Arthur's
stories of his conquests in the optical trade broadened with his smile, and
another few fingers went down. His eyes grew larger and the stories more
interesting as his tongue thickened just a bit. We stood up more slowly and
walked to the most distant display case with less certainty,but 3 meters
distant. The collection of brass and leather, microscopes and telescopes
were awesome, but somewhat unsteady to the eye. Arthur suggested that we
might again sit at the desk and perhaps finish the bottle, too little to
save...best we put it away, and we did. I don't remember too much about the
evening that followed but I will never forget the introduction to a few
fingers of the Scotch sauce made from malted barley. From the memory bank to
share! Cheers, J.B.McCormick M.D.

-----Original Message-----
From: Andrew.Shand@north-bristol.swest.nhs.uk
[mailto:Andrew.Shand@north-bristol.swest.nhs.uk]
Sent: Friday, June 28, 2002 7:53 AM
To: histonet@pathology.swmed.edu
Subject: RE: Water, bRandy Glass?


Please note that though the substance in question is "Scotch" the people are
Scots or Scottish or a complete pain, depending on your point of view.  Many
location-sounding names are complete inventions.  Often they are creations
of the "Brigadoon School of Management".  Keep in mind that  the more
oulandish the word the more likely it is to be real.  

As my father and many others said "they say whisky is a slow poison but then
I'm not in any hurry".

Andy Shand 

-----Original Message-----
From: Monson, Frederick C. [mailto:fmonson@wcupa.edu]
Sent: 28 June 2002 13:14
To: 'List-HistoPath'
Subject: FW: Water, bRandy Glass?


> ----------
> From: 	Monson, Frederick C.
> Sent: 	Friday, June 28, 2002 8:12 AM
> To: 	'Bryan Hewlett'
> Subject: 	RE: Water, bRandy Glass?
> 
> I have been following the trail/thread of water for days, doing the
> scientific thing and trying every represented experiment, only to realize
> that it ihas been a subterfuge for a completely non-scientific discussion
> of various derivatives of malt spoilage.  
> 
> Someone could have at least issued a warning to those who are disarmed by
> the notion that what goes on among histo-listers is exclusively scientific
> and histologic.  Just the cost of acquiring the chemicals has just about
> ruined me for the year!  The storage of all of this stuff is beginning to
> cause concern among my family!  
> 
> And then there's the nomenclature.  I mean really!  I checked with the
> IUPAC site and there is nothing there about a substance called
> "Glendronach".  Its roots are obviously Germanic, yet, no reference to it
> in German dictionaries that I could find.  I have followed it everywhere
> and have been forced to conclude that despite the apparent etymologic
> relation to the Germanic languages, the word must be Scotch.  Only the
> scotch would be so stuporous to name some spoiled ferment "after" a
> "glendro".  Ugh!  What a prefix!  Indeed, that is likely the problem with
> Highland nomenclature, after all is said and done.  
> 
> The Scottish branch of the IUPAC must only meet after the tasting is
> through.
> 
> God bless 'em.  Every one!
> 
> A malty weekend to us all,
> 
> Fred Monson
> 
> Frederick C. Monson, PhD   
> Center for Advanced Scientific Imaging
> Schmucker II Science Center
> West Chester University
> South Church Street and Rosedale
> West Chester, Pennsylvania, USA, 19383
> Phone:  610-738-0437
> FAX:  610-738-0437
> fmonson@wcupa.edu
> CASI URL:  http://darwin.wcupa.edu/casi/
> WCUPA URL:  http://www.wcupa.edu/
> Visitors URL:  http://www.wcupa.edu/_visitors/
> 
> 
> ----------
> From: 	Bryan Hewlett
> Sent: 	Thursday, June 27, 2002 7:18 PM
> To: 	Ian Montgomery; Histonet
> Subject: 	Re: Water.
> 
> Ian,
> 
> A man after my own heart!
> I would agree that the brandy type glass is certainly the way to go if a
> 'Thistle' shape variant is unavailable!
> All this talk of "nectar of the gods" and no mention of my personal
> favourite.
> Glendronach is a wonderfully complex, sherry cask cured, malt, that is
> definitely for the mature palate.
> I must admit that the unblemished spirit is preferable to clumsy dilution
> but personally, I add just 2-3 drops of fresh spring water from an
> eyedropper.
> In fact, I'm going to do just that, right now.
> 
> Bryan
> 
> 
> From: "Ian Montgomery" 
> To: "Histonet" 
> Sent: Monday, June 24, 2002 7:28 PM
> Subject: Fw: Water.
> 
> 
> > Carrie,
> >             Lagavulin, an Islay malt and a peaty one at that, definitely
> for
> > the more mature palate. I'm sure your husband will know, but malt whisky
> > should be drunk from a brandy type glass thus allowing the heat from the
> > hand to release the bouquet and the drinker to nose the whisky. I
> actually
> > enjoy this as much as the drinking. Sip and roll the spirit round the
> entire
> > mouth giving your receptors a good hit of the flavours. Plus of course,
> no
> > ice and if necessary a little fresh spring water. Water is optional,
> some
> > insist that it's necessary while I personally prefer my whisky
> unblemished.
> > For me, The Macallan, Glenfarclas and Arran single malts are the ones of
> > choice.
> > Ian.
> >
> >
> > Dr. Ian Montgomery,
> > Histotechnology,
> > Academic Support Unit,
> > Graham Kerr Building,
> > Institute of Biomedical and Life Sciences,
> > University of Glasgow,
> > Glasgow,
> > Scotland,
> > G12 8QQ.
> > Tel: 0141 339 8855.
> > Lab: 6644.
> > Office: 4652.
> > Fax: 0141 330 5971
> > e-mail: ian.montgomery@bio.gla.ac.uk
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Carrie Kyle-Byrne" 
> > To: "Ian Montgomery" 
> > Sent: Monday, June 24, 2002 4:58 PM
> > Subject: Re: Water.
> >
> >
> > hey ian....speaking of single malt whiskey......my husband (an irishman
> from
> > Cork) was given a bottle of 16yr old Lagavulin (he did a very good thing
> at
> > work).  am i right in assuming this is one of the nectar's of the gods
> and
> > should be saved for a special occassion?
> > carrie kyle-byrne
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Ian Montgomery" 
> > To: "Histonet" 
> > Sent: Sunday, June 23, 2002 1:59 AM
> > Subject: Water.
> >
> >
> > >     John made a few interesting comments regarding Welsh water but
> English
> > > beer! I always sample the local beers on my foreign travels but
> English
> > beer
> > > is the major reason I never venture over the border. It's flat, warm
> and
> > > with a horrendous taste, it's awful. Now, mother nature gave Scotland
> > > perfect water, and you can use it for silver staining, indeed
> Bielschowsky
> > > Gros works better with tap water than distilled. Plus of course we
> were
> > > blessed with the ability to make the amber nectar, whisky. While other
> may
> > > claim to make the king of spirits, single malt whisky is the king of
> > kings.
> > > >From the Orkneys to the Lowlands, Skye to Arran the distilleries
> produce
> > a
> > > drink so pure and filled with complexity of flavour that a single sip
> > > transports you to a world of delights.
> > >     It's a wet windy Sunday morning here in Scotland but as I look out
> my
> > > lounge window in the distance peeping out from the mist I can see Ben
> > > Lomond, Narnain and Vorlich stretching into the distance. I agree the
> > Welsh
> > > hills are beautiful but we have mountains, awesome mountains and
> arctic
> > > habitats over the entire Cairngorm massif. Mmm, maybe my postings on
> > Friday
> > > were a bit harsh and the UK and it's nations are not so bad. So, if
> you
> > > fancy spending some time here your more than welcome.
> > > Ian.
> > >
> > >
> > > Dr. Ian Montgomery,
> > > Histotechnology,
> > > Academic Support Unit,
> > > Graham Kerr Building,
> > > Institute of Biomedical and Life Sciences,
> > > University of Glasgow,
> > > Glasgow,
> > > Scotland,
> > > G12 8QQ.
> > > Tel: 0141 339 8855.
> > > Lab: 6644.
> > > Office: 4652.
> > > Fax: 0141 330 5971
> > > e-mail: ian.montgomery@bio.gla.ac.uk
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 



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