Re: [Histonet] Histology Training Opportunities in KY?

From:

Maybe she could print a notice in the Kentucky newsletter.

http://www.nsh.org/pubs/statenewsltrs.html

Or maybe put up a notice at the state histology symposium

March 18-19, 2005
Kentucky Society for Histotechnology
Louisville, KY
Contact: Renee Matherly, 502-852-5587
Email: rmath0516@aol.com

Just a couple of ideas, in case you get no other responses.

Peggy A. Wenk, HTL(ASCP)SLS
William Beaumont Hospital
Royal Oak, MI 48073

----- Original Message -----
From: "Billing Consultants, LLC" 
To: 
Sent: Sunday, February 27, 2005 12:05 AM
Subject: [Histonet] Histology Training Opportunities in KY?


> Hi everyone,
>
> Would any of you know of any training opportunities in Kentucky for
someone interested in becoming a histology technician?  I have a friend in
Lexington that has a BS in biology and is really interested in breaking into
the field.  She would love to find a place - even volunteer her time if
necessary for the chance to learn.
>
> Any suggestions you may have would be greatly appreciated.
>
> Louri Roberts-Caldwell
>
> histonet-request@lists.utsouthwestern.edu wrote:
> Send Histonet mailing list submissions to
> histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>
> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
> histonet-request@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>
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> histonet-owner@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of Histonet digest..."
>
>
> Today's Topics:
>
> 1. magnesium detection (Kristopher Kalleberg)
> 2. rescue sections for staining (J. Douglas Swarts)
> 3. Equipment (David Deibler)
> 4. 35BH11 (Sebree Linda A.)
> 5. paraffin embedding of mouse tails (Cheung, Lauren)
> 6. RE: stent techniques anyone??? (Linda Jenkins)
> 7. GFP (Carol Bobrowitz)
> 8. CXCR4 & CXCL12 antibodies ( Judy Strauss)
> 9. Re: richard-allen type 9 paraffin (TheBestTime23@aol.com)
> 10. Re:35BH11 (Linda Davis)
> 11. Fw: Re:35BH11 (Linda Davis)
> 12. Histotech Marketability (cfockler@mail1.vcu.edu)
> 13. Square "sample stage" (HIRANO Makoto)
> 14. RE: richard-allen type 9 paraffin (Hugh Luk)
> 15. RE: Histotech Marketability (Luck, Greg D.)
> 16. HT vs. HLT (cfockler@mail1.vcu.edu)
> 17. Collagen-I gel, dye and autofluorescence (Tim Demuth)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 13:34:23 -0500
> From: "Kristopher Kalleberg"
> Subject: [Histonet] magnesium detection
> To: "histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu"
>
> Message-ID:
>
> Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=US-ASCII
>
> Does anyone know of a way to detect magnesium or calcium, through IHC or
> fluorescence, in skin? What about quinalizarin? THanks.
>
> Kris L Kalleberg
> Histologist
> Unilever R&D
> 45 River Rd.
> Edgewater, NJ 07020
> 201 840 2472
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 13:35:48 -0500
> From: "J. Douglas Swarts"
> Subject: [Histonet] rescue sections for staining
> To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Message-ID: <421F7004.5010509@pitt.edu>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
>
> Hello,
> We are trying to stain some sections cut about ten years ago. They are
> rat cranial bases including the middle ear which is the area we are
> interested in. When we stain the sections with H&E we get no
> hematoxylin staining, ie. no nuclei at all, but the eosin gives a nice
> uniform pink color.
>
> The specimens were decalcified in 10% formic acid which was neutralized
> with sodium sulfate according to the histologists notes. The sections
> stained at the time show very little hematoxylin staining. So the
> questions are:
>
> Are these sections overdecalcified? If so is there any technique I can
> use to rescue them?
>
> Did the neutralization with sodium sulfate create the problem? If so
> can I do anything to reverse the effect?
>
> Finally, if one or the other of these situations are true and cannot be
> remedied is there another staining protocol that will give me a
> "reasonable" level of morphologic detail?
>
> Thanks for your help.
>
> Doug
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 12:47:43 -0600
> From: "David Deibler"
>
> Subject: [Histonet] Equipment
> To:
> Message-ID: <000801c51b6a$7e380110$2f01010a@tamtron.ctpl.dns>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> We are looking for an old Shandon portable coverslipping
> hood. Our lab needs to buy on for IHC. If anyone has a
> used one let me know , we would love to purchase it.
>
> David Deibler
> ddeibler@centexpathlab.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 13:16:22 -0600
> From: "Sebree Linda A."
> Subject: [Histonet] 35BH11
> To: "Histonet \(E-mail\)"
> Message-ID:
>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Hi all,
>
> I'm wondering if there is a reference lab out there (preferably offering
"stain only") that does 35BH11 stain. I'm assuming that's a clone but I
don't have any other name for it.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Linda A. Sebree
> University of Wisconsin Hospital & Clinics
> IHC/ISH Clinical & Research Laboratory
> DM223-VA
> 600 Highland Ave.
> Madison, WI 53792
> (608)265-6596
> FAX: (608)262-7174
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 11:14:52 -0800
> From: "Cheung, Lauren"
> Subject: [Histonet] paraffin embedding of mouse tails
> To: "'histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu'"
>
> Message-ID: <8022E9EE6D5ED511A39200A0C9DED0E902FF358E@cvexchange>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Hi everyone,
>
> I work with mouse tail sections, each approximately 4-5 mm in thickness. I
> have been attempting to embed them in paraffin for sectioning however
> sectioning them hasn't been very successful. I can't obtain a ribbon and
the
> sections seem to break out of the paraffin and break apart. I currently
fix
> the tails in 4% Paraformaldehyde overnight and then place them in EDTA for
> 7-10 days for decalcification. Afterwards, I dehydrate them through a
series
> of graded alcohol steps, clear them in xylenes, and then let them sit in
> paraffin. I am wondering if anyone has a good protocol including times for
> each step which I could test out on my samples. Any advice would be
greatly
> appreciated.
>
> Thanks so much,
> Lauren
>
>
> Lauren Cheung
> Stanford University
> Rockson Lab
> Lab: 650-723-5354
> Email: Lcheung@cvmed.stanford.edu
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 6
> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 14:48:30 -0500
> From: Linda Jenkins
> Subject: [Histonet] RE: stent techniques anyone???
> To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Message-ID:
> <5.2.1.1.2.20050225140622.02910608@mailhost.ces.clemson.edu>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed
>
>
> You stated:
> "ok...here is one where i need some guidance.....post mortem manangement
of
> coronary artery stents....those little metal mesh things...should i push
the
> clot out and section it??
> gil corrigan msmdphd tigergil@aol.com best practise anyone???
> ps we are starting a computer section in the aafs ...in case you known
some
> forensic nurds...send them to tigergil@aol.com"
>
> Gil,
> Removing the stent or clot can remove a lot of valuable
> information regarding biocompatibility. A better choice would be to embed
> the section in plastic (methyl methacrylate, glycol methacrylate, etc.)
and
> then section on an automated microtome with tungsten carbide blade or slab
> section with a diamond coated blade and grind the sample to the desired
> thinness. Of course, this requires specialized equipment and technical
> skill that many routine clinical labs may not have. You might want to
> consider sending these out for contract work.
> The private contract labs that process stents on a routine basis
> have some really good procedures BUT cannot (unfortunately) share with
> others as they are bound by non-disclosure agreements.
> If you are familiar with plastics, you may want to give it a try!
> Good Luck,
> Linda
>
> Linda Jenkins, HT
> Clemson University
> Dept. of Bioengineering
> Clemson, SC 29634-0905
> 864.656.5553
> http://www.ces.clemson.edu/bio/research/histo/histo.htm+
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 7
> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 14:21:06 -0600
> From: Carol Bobrowitz
> Subject: [Histonet] GFP
> To: "'Histonet (E-mail)"
> Message-ID: <59DF6640CDC0D7119DF000D0B761393C1A9640@thor.phys.mcw.edu>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Has anyone worked with GFP tissue?
>
> I have found GFP is surviving frozen sections, acetone and 100% alcohol.
>
> I am wondering about FFPE tissue. I'm thinking the heat during processing
> would destroy the GFP.
>
> Does formalin fixation effect the GFP?
>
> Is it possible to fix the tissue in an alcoholic fixative and manually
hand
> process at room temperature and infiltrate into plastic? Would the plastic
> medium destroy the GFP?
>
> What about celloidin embedded tissue? This is not my choice
>
> Any information would be helpful.
>
> I thank everyone on the histonet that has in the past and future helped
me.
> I really appreciate your help.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Carol Ann Bobrowitz
> Histology Laboratory
> Department of Physiology - Room 541
> Medical College of Wisconsin
> 8701 Watertown Plank Road
> Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226
> 414-456-8179
> FAX 414-456-6546
> cbobrowi@mcw.edu
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 8
> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 15:39:58 -0500
> From: " Judy Strauss"
> Subject: [Histonet] CXCR4 & CXCL12 antibodies
> To:
> Message-ID:
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
>
> Can anyone recommend antibodies to CXCR4 (fusin) and CXCL12 that are
> suitable for immunohistochemistry in formalin fixed paraffin embedded rat
> tissue?
>
> Thanks,
>
>
> Judith Strauss
> SUNY Upstate Medical University
> Department of Orthopedic Surgery
> IHP room 3118
> 505 Irving Avenue
> Syracuse, NY 13120
>
> phone: (315) 464-9960
> fax: (315) 464-6638
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 9
> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 16:43:50 EST
> From: TheBestTime23@aol.com
> Subject: Re: [Histonet] richard-allen type 9 paraffin
> To: liz@premierlab.com
> Cc: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Message-ID: <92.2169ca98.2f50f616@aol.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
>
> Thanks for your reply. How long have you been using this paraffin? What
> temperatures are you using in your water baths and processors? What do you
use
> to keep your blocks chilled (if anything)?
>
> I'm having a little difficulty with this new paraffin. I thought it was
> something that I needed time getting used to, but it has been almost 2
months of
> using it and I am still having problems (and so are the 3 other people I
> work with). Problems include compression, fragile ribbons and wrinkles. I
am
> now taking an excessive amount of time and care cutting my blocks only to
> discover minute folds that could not be seen on the waterbath. We cut our
> routine sections at 4 microns and our temperatures are where they should
be for
> what the company recommends (59 in processor and holding tanks and
waterbath
> between 35-40). I just thought someone that had worked with this paraffin
for a
> while could give me some tips. Otherwise I might have to start wearing a
> wig : )
>
> Thank you!
> Megan
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 10
> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 16:00:17 -0600
> From: "Linda Davis"
>
> Subject: [Histonet] Re:35BH11
> To:
> Message-ID: <006001c51b85$642517c0$de0ac942@D6JLZ851>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Linda,
>
> Esoterix will stain 35BH11 if you send them your block. They will send the
block and slides back to you for your pathologist to interpert the stain.
>
> Linda Davis
> Rio Grande Regional Hospital
> McAllen, TX.
> (956) 632-6402
> Fax (956) 632-6641
> -------------- next part --------------
> No virus found in this outgoing message.
> Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
> Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 266.3.0 - Release Date: 2/21/2005
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 11
> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 16:22:53 -0600
> From: "Linda Davis"
>
> Subject: [Histonet] Fw: Re:35BH11
> To:
> Message-ID: <004001c51b88$8c565ee0$6d0ac942@D6JLZ851>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>
> Linda,
>
> Esoterix will stain 35BH11 if you send them your block. They will send the
block and slides back to you for your pathologist to interpert the stain.
>
> Linda Davis
> Rio Grande Regional Hospital
> McAllen, TX.
> (956) 632-6402
> Fax (956) 632-6641
> -------------- next part --------------
> No virus found in this outgoing message.
> Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
> Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 266.3.0 - Release Date: 2/21/2005
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 12
> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 17:55:56 -0500
> From:
> Subject: [Histonet] Histotech Marketability
> To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Message-ID: <200502252255.RAA22846@arrakis.vcu.edu>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
>
> Hello histonetters. . .just a quick question. What is the
> marketability (pay scale ect.) of a tech with a BS in
> biology/chemistry, 2 years of experience with proven competency in all
> aspects, grosses, and has IHC and IF experience? I am looking to get
> feedback from all over the country. Any information would be greatly
> appreciated!
> Thanks.
>
> Candyce Fockler
> Histotechnician
> Anatomic Pathology
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 13
> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 17:48:01 -0600
> From: "HIRANO Makoto"
> Subject: [Histonet] Square "sample stage"
> To:
> Message-ID:
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>
> I am a beginner in frozen sectioning.
> Now I have a silly question.
>
> What is the formal name of a metal, square "sample stage" or "chunk" for
> cryostat?
> I mean the 'partner' of a cryomold.
> I have visited some web sites and consulted some catalogues, but I cannot
> find out the name.
> I have absolutely to order some.
>
> Thanks a lot in advance.
>
> Makoto HIRANO, MD
> Department of Molecular Biosciences
> University of Kansas
> E-mail: mhirano@ku.edu
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 14
> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 17:45:10 -1000
> From: "Hugh Luk"
> Subject: RE: [Histonet] richard-allen type 9 paraffin
> To: TheBestTime23@aol.com
> Cc: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Message-ID:
> Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed
>
> Megan,
>
> Just my 2 cents. If any of this helps, great.
>
> I've found this is one of the hardest, polymer-rich paraffins available. I
> find it similar to Surgipath's standard embedding paraffin and Cardinal's
> (old S/P) Ameraffin. It sections and ribbons well. Currently, however, I
am
> using Ameraffin (also made by Richard Allan), which I find very
> interchangable with type 9.
>
> We modified our tissue processing (a little more time in wax-multiple
> changes totalling around 2 hours at 58 to 62C- and maybe more alcohol),
> deparaffinization (more time in solvent), and two, different microtome
> blades. Sakura's Accu-Edge HIGH profile blades are honed perfectly to cut
> ANYTHING at 4 microns with this wax. The "Slight compression" is balanced
> with "Ease of ribboning." We sometimes use a wider angle on the blade
> holder to increase the rake angle.
>
> For really thin sections, "Sharper" blades (like Duraedge, Leica's, or
> Richard Allan's blades) are required. For example, on delicate biopsies
and
> lymph nodes, 1 or 2 microns is no problem! I also like the way the
paraffin
> holds its shape on the water bath (~38-44C).
>
> I learned histology using Paraplast X-tra. I've tried Paraplast, Paraplast
> plus (with DMSO), Fisher Tissue Prep and Tissue Prep2 embedding medias.
> When we had a new supervisor at QMC, she changed the paraffin to a harder
> wax. We complained about it because it felt different, but I came to
really
> like it. It became my standard where ever I work (thanks Jackie O').
>
> If you are experimenting, you will need to do full switch-overs, every
> instrument using wax should be changed. Mixing paraffins of different
> grades is cheating the experiment.
>
> My conclusion is they are all pretty good. The paraffin is only for
> support; and with a little tinkering, I like to think I can use any one of
> them at any time.
>
> Hugh Luk, HTL (ASCP)
> Former histopathology supervisor CLH
> hluk@crch.hawaii.edu
> Cancer Research Center of Hawaii
> 1236 Lauhala Street, Room 316
> Honolulu, HI 96813
> Tel: (808) 440-5238
> Fax: (808) 586-2982
>
>
> >From: TheBestTime23@aol.com
> >To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> >Subject: [Histonet] richard-allen type 9 paraffin
> >Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 17:42:03 EST
> >
> >Hello everyone,
> >
> >The lab that I work for recently decided to switch to Richard-Allen type
9
> >paraffin. I was wondering if anyone has experience with this paraffin and
> >could give some advice on techniques used in cutting it. Opinions of this
> >product would also be greatly appreciated.
> >
> >Thanks in advance,
> >Megan
> >
> >_______________________________________________
> >Histonet mailing list
> >Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> >http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 15
> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 23:53:17 -0800
> From: "Luck, Greg D."
> Subject: RE: [Histonet] Histotech Marketability
> To: "'cfockler@mail1.vcu.edu'" ,
> histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Message-ID:
>
> Content-Type: text/plain
>
> Candyce,
>
> Request that the HR dept of your current employer do a job code market
> survey for your geographic area. After they tell you your salary is
> equivalent to current market conditions ask them how long it would take to
> fill a vacancy in your area. When they say "We don't know" ask them to try
> to fill a position (real or not). Then inform them what a "histo'temp"
> would cost ($57-60 hr.) to fill in while ???? There is a good deal of
> upward pressure on histotech salaries (well overdue) and given a suitable
> fit now is the time to look towards the future for new opportunities An
> individual's concept of their marketability may differ substantially from
> their employer's but this is limited only by their current work
environment.
> I know, blah, blah, blah. We have a full-time, M-F, day shift, histotech
> position open. This is a seasoned dept looking towards the future to lay
> the foundation of a new staff to take over (+/-5 yrs) as we retire. We
have
> a current opportunity for someone either interested in the eventual
> department manager's role or as a traditional bench histotech. Click on
the
> web links that follow to get a snapshot of our institution and of Spokane:
> www.deaconessmedicalcenter.org & www.visitspokane.com.
> Remember, "making a living" is not the same thing as "making a life".
> Thanks, Greg
>
> Greg Luck, BS, HT(ASCP)
> Anatomic Pathology Supervisor
> Deaconess Medical Center
> 800 W. 5th Ave
> Spokane, WA 99204
> Phone 509.473.7077
> Fax 509.473.7133
> luckg@empirehealth.org
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: cfockler@mail1.vcu.edu [mailto:cfockler@mail1.vcu.edu]
> Sent: Friday, February 25, 2005 2:56 PM
> To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Subject: [Histonet] Histotech Marketability
>
> Hello histonetters. . .just a quick question. What is the marketability
> (pay scale ect.) of a tech with a BS in biology/chemistry, 2 years of
> experience with proven competency in all aspects, grosses, and has IHC and
> IF experience? I am looking to get feedback from all over the country. Any
> information would be greatly appreciated!
> Thanks.
>
> Candyce Fockler
> Histotechnician
> Anatomic Pathology
>
> _______________________________________________
> Histonet mailing list
> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 16
> Date: Sat, 26 Feb 2005 09:17:23 -0500
> From:
> Subject: [Histonet] HT vs. HLT
> To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> Message-ID: <200502261417.JAA24219@despina.vcu.edu>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
>
> What exactly is the difference between and HT and an HLT. ASCP makes
> this distinction with regards to their wage and salary survey. Is one
> certified and the other not? Any information would be greatly
> appreciated! Thanks.
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 17
> Date: Sat, 26 Feb 2005 08:52:48 -0700
> From: Tim Demuth
> Subject: [Histonet] Collagen-I gel, dye and autofluorescence
> To:
> Message-ID:
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="ISO-8859-1"
>
> Hi there,
>
> we are currently trying to cut FFPE sections of multicellular
> tumor-spheroids grown in collagen-I gel (bovine). There are two major
> problems:
> 1) Since the spheroid is so small (diameter ~200-500Ám) and very pale it
is
> extremely hard to identify in the fixed and embedded collagen block. We
> would like to use a dye to visualize the spheroid prior to embedding, so
we
> have some guidance as to where and when to expect the spheroid so we don't
>
> === message truncated ===
>
> ---------------------------------
> Do you Yahoo!?
>  Yahoo! Sports -  Sign up for Fantasy Baseball.
> _______________________________________________
> Histonet mailing list
> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet


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