[Histonet] Re: Mouse tail sectioning

From:Ellen Liebenberg

We routinely section mouse tail using a protocol similar to 
yours.  However, I leave the tissue in 70% alcohol overnight, or longer, 
before processing.  It seems necessary for good dehydration.  I also use 
Clearite instead of xylene.

Ellen Liebenebrg


At 10:01 AM 2/25/2005, you wrote:
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>Today's Topics:
>
>    1. lectins (Margaret Horne)
>    2. Re: RE: pathologists in the lab (shivers down thespine...)
>       (Jo Dee Fish)
>    3. Re: lectins (Paul Webster)
>    4. CAP Immunohistochemistry Tissue Microarray Program (Paula Lucas)
>    5. RE: RE: pathologists in the lab (shivers down thespine...)
>       (Stapf, Ross)
>    6. Re: cryosections (Instrumedics)
>    7. Re: cryosections (Stephen Peters M.D.)
>    8. Re: Re: cryosections (Maria Mejia)
>    9. (no subject) (Dawn Truscott)
>   10. Re: (no subject) (Kelly D Mcqueeney)
>   11. stent techniques anyone??? (TIGERGIL@aol.com)
>   12. Is there any DVD about how to make frozen section?
>       (=?gb2312?q?=CA=E7=C7=ED=20=C9=F2?=)
>   13. 34BE12 on prostate[Scanned] (Jean Gillson)
>   14. stent techniques anyone??? (Stephen Peters M.D.)
>   15. RE: CAP Immunohistochemistry Tissue Microarray Program
>       (Tom McNemar)
>   16. RE: xylene free mounting media (Smith, Allen)
>   17. Re: 34BE12 on prostate[Scanned] (Katri Tuomala)
>   18. JACHO Compliance (Scholz, Stephen J.)
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Message: 1
>Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 14:06:16 ADT
>From: "Margaret Horne" 
>Subject: [Histonet] lectins
>To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>Message-ID: <421DDF57.27008.414902B@localhost>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
>
>Hello Everyone ,
>         Has anyone out there conjugated gold colloid to lectins?
>Some gold conjugated lectins I can buy but others I may have to
>make.
>
>                      Thanks ,
>                                 Margaret
>
>
>
>
>Margaret Horne ,
>Histology Teaching Assistant,
>Dept. of B.SC.,
>Atlantic Veterinary College, U.P.E.I.,
>550 University Ave., Charlottetown,
>P.E.I.,  C1A 4P3
>Canada
>
>
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 2
>Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 10:21:04 -0800
>From: Jo Dee Fish 
>Subject: Re: [Histonet] RE: pathologists in the lab (shivers down
>         thespine...)
>To: Ford Royer 
>Cc: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>Message-ID: 
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" ; format="flowed"
>
>Hello, just my two cents worth,
>
>I agree that if there were a way the residents should spend at least
>a short period of time in a lab so that they can see several
>different staining procedures from beginning to end, from the
>actually biopsy procedure to the staining procedure.  They should see
>some slides of properly and improperly handled samples, just to see
>what a small mistake can lead to further down the line.
>
>On a more personal note:
>There have been times when I have been the patient lying on the
>examination table, that I have wondered if the doctor is handling my
>biopsy correctly.  I wonder if she knows what that small piece of
>tissue was about to go through, either freezing or fixation and
>paraffin embedding, and whether or not she knows that the way she
>handles it now can change dramatically the outcome of whatever tests
>she orders.  I know she has an idea of how precious it is, but does
>she know how one small moment can change the results, such as letting
>the tissue sit on the table to dry slightly, or smashing it, or not
>placing it in enough fixative, correct fixative, etc.  If she had
>spent a week in a lab, she would know more about the steps that the
>tissue goes through, and the precise decisions histologists (or other
>lab personnel) make concerning the handling of the tissue once it is
>in their hands.
>
>One more side note:
>My husband had his "dreaded" but necessary Colonoscopy last fall and
>had a biopsy of one polyp taken.  We waited on pins and needles (no
>pun intended) for the results for two weeks.  I could not believe it
>when they could not provide test results on my husband's biopsy
>because the tissue was "too destroyed to do the ordered tests".  He
>actually had to go through another round of tests and exams because,
>most likely, the doctor probably didn't handle the original sample
>correctly.  Notice I don't blame the lab personnel!
>
>Take care,
>Jo Dee Fish
>**********************************************************************
>**********
>
>Jo Dee Fish
>Research Technologist III
>Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease
>
>Telephone: (415) 734-5766
>Fax: (415) 355-0230
>E-mail: jfish@gladstone.ucsf.edu
>
>Mailing address:
>The J. David Gladstone Institutes
>1650 Owens Street
>San Francisco, CA   94158
>
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 3
>Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 10:23:17 -0800
>From: Paul Webster 
>Subject: Re: [Histonet] lectins
>To: Margaret Horne ,
>         
>Message-ID: 
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
>
>Jeurgen Roth and John Lucocq did lots of studies conjugating lectins to
>colloidal gold particles about 20 years ago. I think they finally concluded
>that it was more efficient to use sequential labeling protocols with
>secondary labeling reagents for detecting lectins. That is, you react the
>lectin with the section, bind an anti-lectin antibody to the lectin and then
>visualize with a gold-conjugated secondary antibody (or protein a gold).
>
>One method they described used fetuin-gold to detect lectin bound to the
>section (Light and electron microscopic demonstration of sialic acid
>residues with the lectin from Limax flavus: a cytochemical affinity
>technique with the use of fetuin-gold complexes. J Histochem Cytochem. 1984
>Nov;32(11):1167-76.).
>
>Paul Webster.
>
>
>
>
>Paul Webster, Ph.D.
>House Ear Institute
>2100 West Third Street
>Los Angeles
>CA 90057-1922
>Phone: 213 273 8026
>Fax: 213 13 739
>E-mail: pwebster@hei.org
>
>
>
>
>
>
>On 2/24/05 6:06 AM, "Margaret Horne"  wrote:
>
> > Hello Everyone ,
> >       Has anyone out there conjugated gold colloid to lectins?
> > Some gold conjugated lectins I can buy but others I may have to
> > make.
> >
> >     Thanks ,
> > Margaret
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Margaret Horne ,
> > Histology Teaching Assistant,
> > Dept. of B.SC.,
> > Atlantic Veterinary College, U.P.E.I.,
> > 550 University Ave., Charlottetown,
> > P.E.I.,  C1A 4P3
> > Canada
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > Histonet mailing list
> > Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> > http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
> >
>
>
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 4
>Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 10:30:44 -0800
>From: "Paula Lucas" 
>Subject: [Histonet] CAP Immunohistochemistry Tissue Microarray Program
>To: "Histonet \(E-mail\)" 
>Message-ID: <004b01c51a9e$f4397b90$7c01a8c0@biopath.org>
>Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>My administrator asked me to research this clinical trial, so of course I
>turn to the experts.
>
>Here is what the advertisement says:
>
>This is a program that stains and interprets tissue arrays for HER2, CD117,
>ER, CD20 and EGFR.  Comparing results to our peers.
>
>It validates our testing strategy and demonstrates eligibility for
>participation in NCI funded clinical trials for HER2.
>
>Has anyone heard of this program and if so, could you tell me anything and
>everything about it?
>
>Thanks in advance.
>
>Paula
>Bio-Path Medical Group
>
>
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 5
>Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 12:41:55 -0600
>From: "Stapf, Ross" 
>Subject: RE: [Histonet] RE: pathologists in the lab (shivers down
>         thespine...)
>To: "Ford Royer" ,
>         
>Message-ID:
>         <74A8B7A904152141BD5AA2761F5D22340E480B@BHDAEXCH11.bhcs.pvt>
>Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="us-ascii"
>
>
>Our new residents after a few weeks on their first Gross Room rotation
>spend a day in histology to see the blocks they grossed get embedded and
>cut.  They get to see first hand the results of their work.  It helps
>tremendously.
>
>This was not always done consistently here.  Hence the story I shared
>earlier.
>
>Ross M Stapf
>Histopathology Manager
>Baylor University Medical Center
>3500 Gaston Ave.
>Dallas, TX 75246
>214-820-2465
>214-820-4110 fax
>RossS@baylorhealth.edu
>
>
>
>
>This e-mail, facsimile, or letter and any files or attachments transmitted=20
>with it contains information that is confidential and privileged. This 
>information is intended only for the use of the individual(s) and 
>entity(ies) to whom it is addressed. If you are the intended recipient, 
>further disclosures are prohibited without proper authorization. If you 
>are not the intended recipient, any disclosure, copying, printing, or use=20
>of this information is strictly prohibited and possibly a violation of 
>federal or state law and regulations. If you have received this 
>information in error, please notify Baylor Health Care System immediately=20
>at 1-866-402-1661 or via e-mail at privacy@baylorhealth.edu. Baylor Health=20
>Care System, its subsidiaries, and affiliates hereby claim all applicable=20
>privileges related to this information.
>
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 6
>Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 14:38:35 -0500
>From: "Instrumedics" 
>Subject: Re: [Histonet] cryosections
>To: "Kelly D Mcqueeney" 
>Cc: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>Message-ID: <01aa01c51aa8$73a15cf0$6401a8c0@INSTRUMEDICS22>
>Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
>         reply-type=response
>
>Frozen sectioning can be difficult and requires a skillful hand. It is often
>hard  to produce a flat, unfolded, fully intact section using the
>conventional  method of retrieving a section on a room temperature slide.
>The result of melting the unfixed section to mount it on the warm slide
>degrades the morphology.
>
>With the  CryoJane Tape-Transfer process the section is captured on a COLD
>tape as it is being cut . The section is flat, uncompressed, intact and  as
>thin a 2 microns. The section is transferred to a COLD slide.   The section
>is still frozen and the morphology preserved A choice of fixation is then
>made depending on the staining protocol to follow. This method makes it
>possible to cut hard tissue or fatty tissue which is often very problematic.
>
>The CryoJane process is easy to learn and makes preparing difficult frozen
>sections easy.
>
>For the details of the CryoJane process please visit our web site
>www.instrumedics.com
>
>Bernice
>Instrumedics
>
>----- Original Message -----
>From: "Kelly D Mcqueeney" 
>To: "Till, Renee" 
>Cc: 
>Sent: Thursday, February 24, 2005 11:54 AM
>Subject: Re: [Histonet] cryosections
>
>
> > Renee,
> >
> > You should insist on an in-depth training from the vendor. Ask for a 4
> > hour training from their cryostat expert, not some sales person. They
> > should offer it to you. The technique is standard but varies from user to
> > user. You'll have to find your way.  I am going to give you our standard
> > protocol for brain IHC.
> >
> > 1) Remove fresh tissue, dip in mounting medium (we use Shandon embedding
> > medium, or you can skip this step) and immediately freeze in ice-cold
> > isopentane (keep on dry ice for 30 minutes prior to freezing). For rat
> > brain, we freeze for 20 seconds. Remove from isopentane and place tissue
> > in a conical tube (some people use molds). Leave the tube on dry ice and
> > immediately store at -70C.
> >
> > 2) Remove tissue from -70C and place in -20C freezer for 1 hour to
> > equilibrate.
> >
> > 3) Drop embedding medium on chuck, add tissue and freeze base with
> > cytocool. Cover tissue with embedding medium (we dip and freeze with
> > cytocool).
> >
> > 4) Place chuck in cryostat and section tissue. I use probe on plus slides
> > from Fisher or Superfrost from VWR.
> >
> > 5) Once sections are mounted on slides, dry slides completely  for 1 hour
> > RT and store at -80C until ready to use.
> >
> > 6) Remove slides from freezer and thaw at RT for 15 minutes. Place slides
> > in fix and stain or perform IHC.
> >
> > There are many different methods for sectioning/storing, etc. Times,
> > tissue, temperature and protocols will vary from lab to lab or person to
> > person.
> >
> > Have fun!
> > Kelly
> >
> > Till, Renee wrote:
> >
> >>Hello.  Our research group just purchased our first cryostat. Until now,
> >>anytime cryosections were needed we had to send out our tissues to
> >>another lab. Is there a good book or other source for general
> >>information about cryosectioning? I am the only histotech in the group,
> >>but have had virtually no experience with cryosections. I know the other
> >>general techs that also do some histology are going to come to me with
> >>all their questions. We basically need to know anything and everything.
> >>Due to the volume of tissues, sectioning won't be performed right as the
> >>tissues are removed from the animal. How do you store them? Do you fix,
> >>and when? What type of slides are best? How do you store the slides
> >>after cryosectioning? Are there specific considerations to take into
> >>account as far as fixing, or anything else depending on the tissue or
> >>what stains will be performed on it? For example, I know already that
> >>there will be some heart and aorta sectioned for fat stains, some pig
> >>gi, possibly mammary gland, uterus, and mouse lung with b-gal.
> >>Thanks in advance for any help or suggestions you can give me.
> >>
> >>
> >>Renee'
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>_______________________________________________
> >>Histonet mailing list
> >>Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> >>http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
> >>
> >
> >
> >
>
>
>
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 7
>Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 11:57:23 -0800 (PST)
>From: "Stephen Peters M.D." 
>Subject: [Histonet] Re: cryosections
>To: Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>Message-ID: <20050224195723.9044.qmail@web30410.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
>Sorry I left the // out of the address for the frozen section tutorial. 
>Fere is the complete link
>http://pathologyinnovations.com/frozen_section_technique.htm
>
>
>
>Stephen Peters M.D.
>Pathology Innovations, LLC
>410 Old Mill Lane,
>Wyckoff, NJ 07481
>201 847 7600
>www.pathologyinnovations.com
>
>Senior Attending Pathologist
>Hackensack University Medical Center
>201 996 4836
>
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 8
>Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 12:14:30 -0800
>From: Maria Mejia 
>Subject: Re: [Histonet] Re: cryosections
>To: "Stephen Peters M.D." 
>Cc: Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>Message-ID: <421E35A6.7010104@ski.org>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed
>
>Dr. Peters, please let us (histonet) know when you have completed & have
>added
>some original techniques for sur. path dissections to your website.
>
>Maria Bartola Mejia
>Neurohistologist
>Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute
>San Francisco, CA 94115
>
>
>Stephen Peters M.D. wrote:
>
> >Sorry I left the // out of the address for the frozen section tutorial.=20
> Fere is the complete link
> >http://pathologyinnovations.com/frozen_section_technique.htm
> >
> >
> >
> >Stephen Peters M.D.
> >Pathology Innovations, LLC
> >410 Old Mill Lane,
> >Wyckoff, NJ 07481
> >201 847 7600
> >www.pathologyinnovations.com
> >
> >Senior Attending Pathologist
> >Hackensack University Medical Center
> >201 996 4836
> >
> >_______________________________________________
> >Histonet mailing list
> >Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> >http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
> >
> >
>
>
>
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 9
>Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 16:38:18 -0500
>From: "Dawn Truscott" 28
>Subject: [Histonet] (no subject)
>To: 
>Message-ID: <001301c51ab9$280deb80$6401a8c0@wowway.com>
>Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>Don't dis "just the sales person"  A good percentage of our sales force 
>are histotechs!!
>
>Dawn M. Truscott, HT(ASCP)
>Richard Allan Scientific
>
>
>
>
>
>Renee,
>
>You should insist on an in-depth training from the vendor. Ask for a 4
>hour training from their cryostat expert, not some sales person. They
>should offer it to you. The technique is standard but varies from user
>to user. You'll have to find your way.  I am going to give you our
>standard protocol for brain IHC.
>Dawn M. Truscott
>
>Recycling New Year's resolutions since 1987.
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 10
>Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 17:14:38 -0500
>From: Kelly D Mcqueeney 
>Subject: Re: [Histonet] (no subject)
>To: Dawn Truscott 28
>Cc: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>Message-ID: <421E51CE.1080702@bms.com>
>Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset=us-ascii
>
>I just had a salesperson try to train us on a new cryostat from Richard
>Allan and it was the first time she used it. We had to put it together
>and teach ourselves, it was a disaster. My point for Renee, make sure
>they know how to use the machine.
>
>Dawn Truscott wrote:
>
> >Don't dis "just the sales person"  A good percentage of our sales force=20
> are histotechs!!
> >
> >Dawn M. Truscott, HT(ASCP)
> >Richard Allan Scientific
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >Renee,
> >
> >You should insist on an in-depth training from the vendor. Ask for a 4
> >hour training from their cryostat expert, not some sales person. They
> >should offer it to you. The technique is standard but varies from user
> >to user. You'll have to find your way.  I am going to give you our
> >standard protocol for brain IHC.
> >Dawn M. Truscott
> >
> >Recycling New Year's resolutions since 1987.
> >_______________________________________________
> >Histonet mailing list
> >Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> >http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
> >
> >
>
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 11
>Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 01:29:30 EST
>From: TIGERGIL@aol.com
>Subject: [Histonet] stent techniques anyone???
>To: histonet@pathology.swmed.edu
>Message-ID: <81.222d9ee0.2f501fca@aol.com>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
>
>ok...here is one where i need some guidance.....post mortem manangement of
>coronary artery stents....those little metal mesh things...should i push the
>clot out and section it??
>gil corrigan msmdphd tigergil@aol.com     best practise anyone???
>ps we are starting a computer section in the aafs ...in case you known some
>forensic nurds...send them to tigergil@aol.com
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 12
>Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 15:25:53 +0800 (CST)
>From: =?gb2312?q?=CA=E7=C7=ED=20=C9=F2?= 
>Subject: [Histonet] Is there any DVD about how to make frozen section?
>To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>Message-ID: <20050225072553.28001.qmail@web15604.mail.cnb.yahoo.com>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=gb2312
>
>Hi,everybody,
>    I am a layman in IHC.I heard from one of my friend that some lab would=20
> provide DVD on how to make frosen sections and so on.Would anyone give 
> me  some hints?
>   Thanks a lot.
>Shuqiong Shen
>Jinling hospital
>Nanjing China
>
>
>
>---------------------------------
>Do You Yahoo!?
>150MP3ѣ=D6
>ŮӦоУѱ=BCͼͿͼ
>1G1000ףŻ=DD
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 13
>Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 11:02:57 -0000
>From: "Jean Gillson" 
>Subject: [Histonet] 34BE12 on prostate[Scanned]
>To: 
>Message-ID:
> 
><1030B679AD69D6119C3F00080210DD9D05AC0348@bhrv-nt-11.bhrv.nwest.nhs.uk>
>
>Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>Dear all fellow histologist,
>
>We seem to have a recurrent problem with 34BE12 IHC staining on both
>prostate chippings and prostatectomy specimens.  Some basal cells stain
>whilst others that should stain are negative.  Our procedure is Trypsin for
>12 minute at pH 7.8 and 37 degrees C.  We use a Dako autostainer machine and
>our antibody is from Dako.  Previous spec sheets state Trypsinisation but
>our most recent one states heat retrieval.  So as a test we did both
>retrieval methods.  Oddly enough, microwaved in Dako retrieval solution was
>slightly better in prostatectomy specimens than trypsin (still uneven
>staining) and worst in chipping specimens.  Can anyone offer any advice?
>What antibody panels are people doing for prostate cases?  Help desperately
>needed!!
>
>Jean Gillson BMS2
>
>Histology Department
>
>Blackburn Royal Infirmary
>
>Blackburn
>
>UK
>
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 14
>Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 04:41:54 -0800 (PST)
>From: "Stephen Peters M.D." 
>Subject: [Histonet] stent techniques anyone???
>To: Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>Message-ID: <20050225124154.22991.qmail@web30407.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
>I had do do this on a research project on pig carotids where the goal was=20
>to see the reaction to the stent which was buried in an organizing fibrous=20
>tissue responce. I took a strong sissor and cut the vessel transversely 
>into 2-3mm rings. Using a forceps I was able to pull the now cut wires 
>making up the stent out of the tissue leaving the tissue pretty much 
>intact. It came out quite well.
>PS don't use your favorite sissor!
>
>
>Stephen Peters M.D.
>Pathology Innovations, LLC
>410 Old Mill Lane,
>Wyckoff, NJ 07481
>201 847 7600
>www.pathologyinnovations.com
>
>Senior Attending Pathologist
>Hackensack University Medical Center
>201 996 4836
>
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 15
>Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 07:45:03 -0500
>From: Tom McNemar 
>Subject: RE: [Histonet] CAP Immunohistochemistry Tissue Microarray
>         Program
>To: 'Paula Lucas' , "Histonet (E-mail)"
>         
>Message-ID:
>         <6CD94D97ED7D924BA5C2B588FA95282139678D@nt_exchange.lmhealth.org>
>Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>Not much to tell, it's prety much like any other survey.  They send you 1
>slide with multiple tissue samples.  You stain it, the pathologists reads it
>and you send it back.
>
>We did it one year.  It's the same four antibodies every year so I haven't
>bought it again.
>
>Tom Mc Nemar HT(ASCP)
>Histology Supervisor
>Licking Memorial Hospital
>Newark, Ohio 43055
>
>
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Paula Lucas [mailto:plucas@biopath.org]
>Sent: Thursday, February 24, 2005 1:31 PM
>To: Histonet (E-mail)
>Subject: [Histonet] CAP Immunohistochemistry Tissue Microarray Program
>
>
>My administrator asked me to research this clinical trial, so of course I
>turn to the experts.
>
>Here is what the advertisement says:
>
>This is a program that stains and interprets tissue arrays for HER2, CD117,
>ER, CD20 and EGFR.  Comparing results to our peers.
>
>It validates our testing strategy and demonstrates eligibility for
>participation in NCI funded clinical trials for HER2.
>
>Has anyone heard of this program and if so, could you tell me anything and
>everything about it?
>
>Thanks in advance.
>
>Paula
>Bio-Path Medical Group
>
>
>_______________________________________________
>Histonet mailing list
>Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 16
>Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 09:16:00 -0500
>From: "Smith, Allen" 
>Subject: RE: [Histonet] xylene free mounting media
>To: "Robin Maxwell-Nunn" 
>Cc: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>Message-ID:
>         <4C051EAE581BB646BF53A749A73FBA2D1F3C96@exchsrv01.barrynet.barry.edu>
>Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="us-ascii"
>
>If one sticks to stains that are fast in absolute alcohol, one can mount
>from absolute alcohol in Euparal (gum sandarac), which uses eucalyptol as a
>solvent.  Hematoxylin fades slowly in Euparal, but is said to keep virtually
>forever in Euparal Vert.
>
>Allen A. Smith, Ph.D.
>Professor of Anatomy
>Barry University School of Graduate Medical Sciences
>     Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
>Miami Shores, Florida  33161
>
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>[mailto:histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu] On Behalf Of Robin
>Maxwell-Nunn
>Sent: Monday, February 21, 2005 8:28 PM
>To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>Subject: [Histonet] xylene free mounting media
>
>
>Hi
>We have a tech in our lab who is sensitive to xylene (exhibits headaches,
>puffy eyes and itchy skin).  We are switching to Formula 83 by CBG Biotech
>for frozen sections but still need a mountant that is both compatible with
>this and xylene free.  Does anyone have any suggestions?
>
>thanks,
>Robin Maxwell-Nunn, MLT
>St Mary's General Hospital,
>Kitchener, Ontario, Canada.
>
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>Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
>
>The information transmitted is intended only for the person or entity to 
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>Barry University - Miami Shores, FL (http://www.barry.edu)
>
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 17
>Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 11:38:08 -0500
>From: "Katri Tuomala" 
>Subject: Re: [Histonet] 34BE12 on prostate[Scanned]
>To: "Jean Gillson" ,
>         
>Message-ID: <001601c51b58$63715190$6a9a9618@Katri>
>Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
>         reply-type=original
>
>Hi Jean,
>Yes,  clone 34 BE12 can be a problematic one. Over the years we have
>struggled same as you, but seem to have pretty good handle on it now. Our
>antibody is same as yours and we find, that more intense HIER is required.
>We are using citrate buffer (EDTA or others may be better, you'll have to
>try) in Decloaker. Our citrate buffer is home made and we add Tween 20 into
>it. Our dilution of the primary antibody now is 1:30.
>I hope this helps...
>Katri
>
>Katri Tuomala
>Hamilton,Ontario, Canada
>
>----- Original Message -----
>From: "Jean Gillson" 
>To: 
>Sent: Friday, February 25, 2005 6:02 AM
>Subject: [Histonet] 34BE12 on prostate[Scanned]
>
>
> > Dear all fellow histologist,
> >
> > We seem to have a recurrent problem with 34BE12 IHC staining on both
> > prostate chippings and prostatectomy specimens.  Some basal cells stain
> > whilst others that should stain are negative.  Our procedure is Trypsin
> > for
> > 12 minute at pH 7.8 and 37 degrees C.  We use a Dako autostainer machine
> > and
> > our antibody is from Dako.  Previous spec sheets state Trypsinisation but
> > our most recent one states heat retrieval.  So as a test we did both
> > retrieval methods.  Oddly enough, microwaved in Dako retrieval solution
> > was
> > slightly better in prostatectomy specimens than trypsin (still uneven
> > staining) and worst in chipping specimens.  Can anyone offer any advice?
> > What antibody panels are people doing for prostate cases?  Help
> > desperately
> > needed!!
> >
> > Jean Gillson BMS2
> >
> > Histology Department
> >
> > Blackburn Royal Infirmary
> >
> > Blackburn
> >
> > UK
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > Histonet mailing list
> > Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> > http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 18
>Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 11:01:23 -0600
>From: "Scholz, Stephen J." 
>Subject: [Histonet] JACHO Compliance
>To: 
>Message-ID:
> 
><7F1312711CA7474A89B3DF8BA0BA54D0F5F190@pmc-rfd-mx01.intranet.osfnet.org>
>
>Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="us-ascii"
>
>Hello all;
>
>We are about to have a JACHO inspection and a problem was brought to my 
>attention.  It involves using two identifiers on all laboratory specimens.
>
>The below paragraph is from JCAHO FAQ web site for laboratory compliance 
>with the National Patient Safety Goals.  This particular statement seems 
>to answer the question about use of only one identifying number on a 
>pathology or any lab specimen.  Please let me know your interpretation and=20
>how your laboratories comply to it.  Currently we have only the case 
>number (hand written) on the blocks and only the case number (hand 
>written) on the slides until after staining at which point there are 
>printed labels put on them.
>
>Take note that this FAQ was updated in January, 2005.
>
>
>FAQ-We use a label for the initial patient sample that contains only one 
>unique identifier, a number, to identify laboratory specimens.  This 
>unique identifier can be traced to multiple patient identifiers. Does this=20
>meet the intent of the goal?
>ANS-No. The intent is to use two separate identifiers on the specimen 
>label. Confidence in an accurate identification improves as the number of=20
>identifiers increases, depending upon their uniqueness.  A single 
>identifier can be more easily misread, resulting in avoidable errors. Bar=20
>coding that includes two or more person-specific identifiers (not room 
>number) will comply with this requirement. (New 1/18/05)
>
>
>
>What are suggestions to my problem.
>
>
>Stephen J. Scholz HT(ASCP)
>Histology Coordinator
>OSF St. Anthony Medical Center
>Rockford IL
>
>Phone: 815-395-5410
>Fax: 815-395-5364
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>_______________________________________________
>Histonet mailing list
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>http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>End of Histonet Digest, Vol 15, Issue 39
>****************************************



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