Re: [Histonet] sectioning

From:"Gudrun Lang"

In Austria and Germany it is common to use sliding microtomes. In our lab we
use rotary microtoms only for making serial cuts of renal biopsies.
Trimming and sectioning is really faster using sliding microtomes. Perhaps
it demands more effort, because of moving the slide forwards and backwards
fast, but with the modern microtomes it became much more easier.
We cut tissue from smallest lung biopsies, bone marrow-biopsies to all
routine surgical tissues. We are able to cut at 1 to 3 and more micrometer

Trimming: 5-10 x with 30 um; then 2-3x with 3 um to get an even surface.
Then take off a good cut with 3 um, put it on the water bath with a brush,
mounting it on the slide and ready.  You get allways single cuts and no
I have found a link, where you can look at a modern sliding microtom. Ours
look a little big different.

I hope my English was good enough to explain and I would be glad if you
visit our small city.

Gudrun Lang
Linz, Austria

----- Original Message -----
From: "George Cole" 
To: "'Gudrun Lang'" 
Sent: Saturday, December 20, 2003 10:02 PM
Subject: RE: [Histonet] sectioning

> Gudrun;
> The sliding microtome you mention---the only sliding microtomes I came
> across in my long career, were used for extremely difficult sectioning.
> They were a bit awkward to use. Section thickness was always pretty
> large. Would a rotary microtome, which seems to be standard in the labs
> I've seen, be easier and faster to use?  I never did regular daily
> surgicals.  I was always cutting muscles and nerves, with some kidneys
> in the days when I did immunofluorescnce studies of them.  I also cut
> occasional liver, diaphragm, and brain tissues, but never on an all day
> routine. It sounds like you work up a pretty good speed on the
> mnicrotome you use, whatever it is. Nice to hear from you---I would like
> to visit Linz and other Mozart territories.
> -----Original Message-----
> From:
> [] On Behalf Of Gudrun
> Lang
> Sent: Saturday, December 20, 2003 11:19 AM
> To: Histonetliste;
> Subject: Re: [Histonet] sectioning
> We use only slide microtomes for routine histology. I am working as a
> histotech for ten years.
> My average speed is 10 slides in 10-15 min (one cut on one slide);
> and 10 slides in 20-25 min (4 cuts on one slide, biopsies)
> We (2-3 persons) cut every day from 7 to 11. And each person does ca.
> 80-100
> slides to manage the extent of one day.
> After this we are happy to stand up. I cannot believe, that anyone cuts
> eight hours a day without any troubles. (on body and mind)
> Gudrun Lang
> Linz, Austria
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: 
> To: 
> Sent: Friday, December 19, 2003 9:44 PM
> Subject: [Histonet] sectioning
> > Hello everyone,
> >
> > This is the first time I use histonet and I hope I do it right.:) I
> have a
> pretty general question and hope you can help me with it. Can anyone
> tell me
> what is the average number of slides one tech. can section per an 8 hour
> day?
> >
> > I was recently asked this question by my boss and truthfully I can
> produce
> 250+ slides for serial cuts, more if it is regular sectioning. The
> reason I
> am asking is because I am curious to know if this is the norm or if I
> have
> to work on my speed. I also have to add that I have only been doing this
> type of work for about 1.5 years now.Hope someone can give me the
> information I seek.
> >
> > Happy Holidays everyone!!
> >
> >
> > Sincerely,
> >
> > Elisa Gonzalez
> > Research Tech. II
> > Doheny Eye Institute
> > Pathology Department
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > Histonet mailing list
> >
> >
> >
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