RE: How does acid alcohol / picric acid "set" ink on tissue?

From:emmanuelm@health.nb.ca (Emmanuel Maicas)

It basically fixes the surface layer of tissue, thus coagulating the ink
with the serum proteins. Formalin does the same thing but more slowly. I
never use these solutions because it introduces a lot of acid in the final
fixative (phosphate-buffered formalin), which does not have enough buffering
capacity to neutralize it (measure the pH the next morning!). I suspect this
acid is a source of variation in IHC staining for estrogen receptors in
breast cancer. I simply ink and blot dry with several changes of gauze or
paper towel before cutting the tissue - works well! It also eliminates the
problem of storing picric acid powder.
Emmanuel Maicas, Pathologist in Moncton, Canada

-----Original Message-----
From: Alex Knisely [mailto:alex.knisely@kcl.ac.uk]
Sent: Friday, August 30, 2002 4:26 AM
To: HistoNet Server
Subject: How does acid alcohol / picric acid "set" ink on tissue?


Mechanism question, with some background in the text below:

Through what steps does immersion in Bouin's fluid (with picric acid) or
acid alcohol "set" India ink, or other cutting-in station coloured inks,
onto tissues?

Somehow I expect that Dr Monson will have this information at his fingers'
tips.

Best thanks for any replies

Alex K

>X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft Exchange V6.0.5762.3
>Subject: RE: Thanks --
>Date: Thu, 29 Aug 2002 14:23:07 -0400
>X-MS-Has-Attach:
>X-MS-TNEF-Correlator:
>Thread-Topic: Thanks --
>Thread-Index: AcJPJPuUDgzjQGGfRA2rC8npv5OVmQAY2Cmw
>From: "Smith, Allen" 
>To: "Alex Knisely" 
>X-MailScanner: Found to be clean
>
>The principal active ingredient in Bouin's fluid is picric acid, which is
>mostly ionized above
>pH 2.  In some cases picric acid does act as a mordant.  I don't think it
>does in this case.  "Mordanting" implies a particular mechanism; I use the
>word only where there is evidence for such a mechanism.
>
>Allen A. Smith, Ph.D.
>Barry University
>School of Graduate Medical Sciences
>    Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
>Miami Shores, Florida  33161-6695
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Alex Knisely [mailto:alex.knisely@kcl.ac.uk]
>Sent: Thursday, August 29, 2002 2:25 AM
>To: Smith, Allen
>Subject: Thanks --
>
>
>-- is it thus wrong to write (or as I do to dictate during gross
>descriptions) "The resection margins are inked black and the ink is
>mordanted in Bouin's fluid / acid alcohol"?
>
>Alex K
>
>At 12:23 28/08/02 -0400, you wrote:
>>   A mordant is an ion,  almost always metallic, that binds to something
in
>>the tissue and to the  dye.  a dye  molecule that binds to the mordant or
>>directly to a part of the  tissue.   Allen A. Smith, Ph.D.
>>Barry University
>>School of Graduate Medical  Sciences
>>    Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
>>  33161-6695     -----Original Message-----
>>From: kevin williams    [mailto:akwilliams75@hotmail.com]
>>Sent: Wednesday, August 28, 2002    11:23 AM
>>To: HistoNet Server
>>Subject: The difference    between a Mordant and an Auxocrome
>>
>>          are they one    in the same.    Thanks for all your help Kev.
>>   Get more from the Web. FREE MSN Explorer download :
>http://explorer.msn.com
>>
>>
>Alex Knisely, MD
>Consultant Histopathologist
>
>alex.knisely@kcl.ac.uk
>
>Institute of Liver Studies
>King's College Hospital
>Denmark Hill
>London  SE5 9RS  UK
>
>+44 (0)20 - 7346 - 3125 telefax
>+44 (0)20 - 7346 - 4627 office
>
Alex Knisely, MD
Consultant Histopathologist

alex.knisely@kcl.ac.uk

Institute of Liver Studies
King's College Hospital
Denmark Hill
London  SE5 9RS  UK

+44 (0)20 - 7346 - 3125 telefax
+44 (0)20 - 7346 - 4627 office





<< Previous Message | Next Message >>