[Histonet] RE: bcl-2 on Nexes

From:"White, Lori"

Hi Lynda,
What manufacturer are you using for your antibody?  The reason I ask is that
we were using Novocastra and the antibody did not seem to like the heat on
the Nexes stainer - I had to do the staining manually at room temp.  I have
since switched to Dako (M0887) and it's working quite nicely....
Lori

-----Original Message-----
From: histonet-request@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
[mailto:histonet-request@lists.utsouthwestern.edu] 
Sent: Thursday, April 08, 2004 10:23 PM
To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Subject: Histonet Digest, Vol 5, Issue 13

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Today's Topics:

   1. Re: xylene substitute (Judy Pariser)
   2. Looking for Guss Mondragon (Victoria Baker)
   3. CSH Symposium (May 13-16, 2004) - Hotel Phone Number
      (Laurie Colbert)
   4. RE: p21 (Bartlett, Jeanine)
   5. RE: Sponge problems in processing (Smith, Allen)
   6. Thermo Shandon automatic stainer (Rizo, Christian)
   7. RE: Sponge problems in processing (Stacy McLaughlin)
   8. Re: Sponge problems in processing (DDittus787@aol.com)
   9. Antigen retrieval for heart tissues? (Barlow, Gillian)
  10. [BULK] - Re: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing
      (Fred Underwood)
  11. Histology opening in S CA. (Dave Johnson)
  12. Re: Histonet Digest, Vol 5, Issue 11 (Amos Brooks)
  13. Re: semithin-ultrathin - thank you (Gudrun Lang)
  14. Interesting eosinophilic artifacts (Gayle Callis)
  15. Eosinophilic artifacts posted in Histonet gallery (Gayle Callis)
  16. RE: Re: Histonet Digest, Vol 5, Issue 11 (Patsy Ruegg)
  17. RE: Re: Histonet Digest, Vol 5, Issue 11 (Luis Chiriboga)
  18. Re: Re: Histonet Digest, Vol 5, Issue 11 (Patti Loykasek)
  19. caspase 3 and transferrin receptor for rats (gsp26@drexel.edu)
  20. RE: caspase 3 and transferrin receptor for rats
      (Favara, Cynthia (NIH/NIAID))
  21. Whipf's polychrome (Dixon, Leslie E.)
  22. bcl-2 on Nexes (Derek & Lynda Leopold)
  23. Perfusion System (Linresearch@aol.com)
  24. ALAS (Sharon Cooperman)
  25. lysosomal markers (Sharon Cooperman)
  26. Re: heavy - chain deposition desease  ( Katri Tuomala)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Thu, 8 Apr 2004 13:09:54 -0400
From: "Judy Pariser" 
Subject: Re: [Histonet] xylene substitute
To: "Eddie Marquez" ,
	
Message-ID: <003001c41d8c$503a4700$0600a8c0@IN4>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="iso-8859-1"

Dear Eddie,

I just noticed your posting dated March 15, 2004 regarding xylene
substitutes.  I am the Project Manager for CBG Biotech's new clearing
solvent, Formula 83.

Formula 83 is completely non-toxic.  In clinical and laboratory tests,
Formula 83 consistently outperformed xylene and other xylene substitutes.
It was designed specifically for tissue processing and staining.

Formula 83 dries slides faster, dissolves paraffin faster, and recycles
faster than xylene.  Additionally, it will not harden tissue as xylene does,
and has better lipid extraction.

I would be happy to share more information with you.  Additionally, I can
send to you a reprint of a recently published article from Health Beat, a
publication of the Healthcare Division of The American Society of Safety
Engineers.

I can be reached at the phone number or email address below.

Best regards,

Judy Pariser
Project Manager
Email: jpariser@cbgbiotech.com
Phone: 800-941-9484
Fax: 614-863-1676
Website: http://www.cbgbiotech.com

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Eddie Marquez" 
To: 
Sent: Monday, March 15, 2004 4:19 PM
Subject: [Histonet] xylene substitute



Aloha from Hawaii,

Just needed some info.-Has anybody used xylene substitute with a linear
stainer; for standard H&E's?  If so, how good are the results? May I also
have the brand name.

Thank you,

Eddie from the Cancer Research


_______________________________________________
Histonet mailing list
Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet




------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Thu, 8 Apr 2004 10:51:56 -0700 (PDT)
From: Victoria Baker 
Subject: [Histonet] Looking for Guss Mondragon
To: HistoNet Server 
Message-ID: <20040408175156.12088.qmail@web12108.mail.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Hi Everyone,

Guss if you're out there I need some of your sage
wisdom.  

OR

If anyone knows where Guss might be please contact me
by this e-mail address.

Thanks in advance.

Vikki Baker
Institute for Cancer Prevention
Valhalla, NY  10595

__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Small Business $15K Web Design Giveaway 
http://promotions.yahoo.com/design_giveaway/



------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Thu, 8 Apr 2004 11:06:54 -0700
From: "Laurie Colbert" 
Subject: [Histonet] CSH Symposium (May 13-16, 2004) - Hotel Phone
	Number
To: ,	"Debbie Cobb (E-mail)"
	
Message-ID:
	
<0BE6ADFAE4E7E04496BF21ABD346628001C5BE91@EXCHANGE1.huntingtonhospital.com>
	
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="iso-8859-1"

The phone number that was listed for hotel reservations at the Burbank
Hilton on the California Society for Histotechnology registration form is
incorrect.  The correct number is (800) 840-6450.  We are sorry for any
inconvenience this has caused.  If you have any questions please contact
Debbie Cobb at (818) 503-6807.



------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Thu, 8 Apr 2004 14:14:23 -0400
From: "Bartlett, Jeanine" 
Subject: RE: [Histonet] p21
To: "Richard Cartun" ,
	
Message-ID:
	
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="utf-8"

Please share any information with the list please.
 
Thanks!

	-----Original Message----- 
	From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu on behalf of Richard
Cartun 
	Sent: Wed 4/7/2004 7:26 PM 
	To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu 
	Cc: 
	Subject: [Histonet] p21
	
	

	Has anyone tried Pharmagen's mAb to p21 (clone 6B6)?  If so, has it
	worked well on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue?  Thank you.
	
	Richard Cartun
	Director, Immunopathology
	Hartford Hospital
	Hartford, CT  06102
	
	"Home of the 2004 Men's and Women's Division I College Basketball
	National Champions!"
	
	_______________________________________________
	Histonet mailing list
	Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
	http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
	


------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Thu, 8 Apr 2004 14:31:43 -0400
From: "Smith, Allen" 
Subject: RE: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing
To: "Marshall Terry Dr,	Consultant Histopathologist"
	
Cc: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Message-ID:
	<494304423C63E246A5CF87A3AEEB577011B5DE@bumail01.barrynet.barry.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="us-ascii"

    If an object is under water and the air pressure above the water is
reduced, the total pressure on the object is reduced.  If the object is only
17 feet down (1/2 Atm water pressure plus 1 Atm air pressure), halving the
air pressure above it reduces the total pressure by 33% (1 Atm instead of 1
1/2 Atm).  If the air pressure above it is reduced by 97% (to 0.03 Atm), the
water boils at room temperature! 

    If you seal the bag of fruit at normal atmospheric pressure, put the bag
17 feet underwater, and reduce the air pressure above by 50%, the fruit does
not release juice because the total pressure (1 Atm) is still as high as
when it was sealed.  However, if you reduce the air pressure by 95%, the
total pressure on the fruit will be 0.55 Atm.  If you reduce the pressure to
0.55 Atm suddenly, air dissolved in the fruit juice will rupture the fruit
and juice will leak out.  If you reduce the pressure slowly to 0.55 Atm, the
air will diffuse out without rupturing the fruit.

    If you slowly reduce the pressure on the fruit to 0.03 Atm, the water
will diffuse out slowly, and you will have intact dehydrated fruit.  If you
reduce the pressure on the fruit 0.03 Atm suddenly, the rapid boiling of the
juice will rupture the fruit and some juice will leak out before it, too,
boils.

Allen A. Smith, Ph.D.
Professor of Anatomy
School of Graduate Medical Sciences 
Barry University 
Miami Shores, FL
(also PADI divemaster)

-----Original Message-----
From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
[mailto:histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu] On Behalf Of Marshall
Terry Dr,Consultant Histopathologist
Sent: Thursday, April 08, 2004 11:41 AM
To: Kemlo Rogerson; Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Subject: RE: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing


Kemlo comes back (well he would):

"But that's cos the air is trying to escape to equilibrate the outside
reduction in air pressure. If the airplane was under water and had no air in
it and the air pressure was reduced on top of the water then it would have
no effect on the airplane, would it?"

Any explanations as to what this means to me please.

He continues:

"Similarly the fruit in the bag is not under water, is it? 
Put the fruit under water in the bag and then reduce the pressure above the
water, bet no juice comes out of the fruit except if there is trapped air
and that forces some out as it exits."

No, the fruit in the bag is not under water, but soon it is under fruit
juice. The first thing that happens when you apply vacuum is that the air
goes, then the fruit juice exits the fruit. However, there is a difference
in the two systems, in that the bag in the vacuum press collapses. The
retort hopefully does not. Would this make a difference? My capacity to
conceive some of these concepts is quite paltry.

"Bet you $10".

I don't do bets or dollars.

Someone put a car sponge in a VIP and stop it at the appropriate time would
you?

 Terry L (wishing I'd kept my mouth shut) Marshall

Dr Terry L  Marshall, B.A.(Law), M.B.,Ch.B.,F.R.C.Path  Consultant
Pathologist  Rotherham General Hospital  South Yorkshire  England
        terry.marshall@rothgen.nhs.uk

-----Original Message-----
From: Kemlo Rogerson [mailto:kemlo@tiscali.co.uk]
Sent: 08 April 2004 16:14
To: Marshall Terry Dr, Consultant Histopathologist;
Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Subject: RE: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing



Bet you $10

Mr Kemlo Rogerson MSc DMS MIBiol CBiol FIBMS
Tel: 0208 970 8414
Mob: 07830 196072 
Mobile E-Mail kemlorogerson@3mail.com                     
FAX & Answer Phone 0871 242 8094
E-mail Accounts:  
             kemlo@tiscali.co.uk or 
             kemlo1@btinternet.com 
Disclaimer: The information contained in this message and/or any
attachments(s) may be of a private and confidential nature, and is intended
solely for the attention of the addressee. If you have received this message
in error or feel you should not have been the intended recipient, please
return it and any attachments to the sender immediately. All messages
relating to this communication should then be deleted from your system.
Unauthorised usage, copying, disclosure or alteration of this message and/or
attachment(s) is strictly prohibited. Barking, Havering and Redbridge
Hospitals NHS Trust will not be held responsible for any direct or indirect
damages which may arise from alteration of this message or any
attachment(s), by a third party or resulting from the transmission of a
virus.
 
 
 
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
[mailto:histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu] On Behalf Of Marshall
Terry Dr,Consultant Histopathologist
Sent: 08 April 2004 13:25
To: Kemlo Rogerson; Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Subject: RE: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing

When you see these "action thrillers" in airplanes, and a
bullet/bomb/whatever makes a hole in the fuselage, everything rushes to the
hole, not just the air. I can't envisage this process of sucking only the
air or "surface air bubbles" and leaving a soggy sponge replete with its
load. Under a vacuum, surely the sponge will collapse as the contained
liquid runs out towards the exit. If you apply vacuum to a plastic bag
containing fruit, the juice comes out, and this forms the basis of a vacuum
press, one of which I possess.

So there.


Dr Terry L Marshall, B.A.(Law), M.B.,Ch.B.,F.R.C.Path  Consultant
Pathologist  Rotherham General Hospital  South Yorkshire  England
        terry.marshall@rothgen.nhs.uk

-----Original Message-----
From: Kemlo Rogerson [mailto:kemlo@tiscali.co.uk]
Sent: 07 April 2004 16:48
To: Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Subject: RE: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing


I thought vacuum processing only 'sucked away' air. I mean if you reduce the
air pressure above the fluids then that reduces pressure within the tissue
that was preventing air escaping (as it has a positive pressure). I suppose
if you reduce the Saturated Vapour Pressure of a solvent then that would
cause more solvent to vapourise but wouldn't that be from the surface of the
solvent rather than within the tissue? 

Mr Kemlo Rogerson MSc DMS MIBiol CBiol FIBMS
Tel: 0208 970 8414
Mob: 07830 196072 
Mobile E-Mail kemlorogerson@3mail.com                     
FAX & Answer Phone 0871 242 8094
E-mail Accounts:  
             kemlo@tiscali.co.uk or 
             kemlo1@btinternet.com 
Disclaimer: The information contained in this message and/or any
attachments(s) may be of a private and confidential nature, and is intended
solely for the attention of the addressee. If you have received this message
in error or feel you should not have been the intended recipient, please
return it and any attachments to the sender immediately. All messages
relating to this communication should then be deleted from your system.
Unauthorised usage, copying, disclosure or alteration of this message and/or
attachment(s) is strictly prohibited. Barking, Havering and Redbridge
Hospitals NHS Trust will not be held responsible for any direct or indirect
damages which may arise from alteration of this message or any
attachment(s), by a third party or resulting from the transmission of a
virus.
 
 
 
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
[mailto:histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu] On Behalf Of Marshall
Terry Dr,Consultant Histopathologist
Sent: 06 April 2004 16:21
To: Steven E. Slap; Gayle Callis; Gudrun Lang;
Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Subject: RE: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing

OK. 200 ml. of liquid retained, with 100 blocks.
However, with a vacuum processor, is that not all "sucked away"?

BTW, should it sound otherwise, I hate the things (but am stuck with them).

Dr Terry L Marshall, B.A.(Law), M.B.,Ch.B.,F.R.C.Path  Consultant
Pathologist  Rotherham General Hospital  South Yorkshire  England
        terry.marshall@rothgen.nhs.uk

-----Original Message-----
From: Steven E. Slap [mailto:siksik03@comcast.net]
Sent: 06 April 2004 16:14
To: Gayle Callis; Gudrun Lang; Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Subject: Re: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing


Hi HistoNetters

I agree with Gayle, and the other posters who pointed out that 
sponges carry over 1ml of fluid per sponge (so, with 100 cassettes, 
200 sponges, that's a lot of carryover).

I have had a lot of success with the biopsy cassettes which Gayle 
refers to, both in microwaves and in conventional tissue processors. 
You can request samples from Lab Storage Systems in St. Louis by 
phone at (800) 345-4167 or by e-mailing Rita Lovshe at 
rcl@labstore.com.

best regards,
Steven Slap

At 10:20 AM -0700 4/1/04, Gayle Callis wrote:
>To: "Gudrun Lang" ,
Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>From: Gayle Callis 
>Cc:
>Subject: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing
>
>Gudrun,
>
>We no longer use sponges, prefer to place tissues in tissue embedding
bags
>(Fisher) which look like tea bags or the little nylon bags (not as easy
to
>handle, but thinner than sponges) and a tidge stiffer than tea bags. 
>Sponges can cause artifacts in your tissues, looking like triangular
holes
>in section.  This was published by Freida Carson in Journal of 
>Histotechnology, 1980's.  Using tea bags may not be as fast during 
>embedding, but speed there is a trade off for having to reprocess
important
>tissue samples, ho hum tedious and time consuming while patient waits.
>
>You analysis of problem sound correct with a poor exchange of solvents 
>through sponges. If you pack cassettes super tight in basket/cassette 
>holder inside processor you can impede solvent flow or if sponges are 
>crammed too tight agaist tissue then lid smashed down on tissue/sponge 
>sandwich - this is like having too thick a tissue in a cassette.
>
>There are some clever biopsy cassettes with a folding, fine mesh
inserts
>fitting inside a cassette.  These may be worth a try to avoid sponges.
I
>think they are available through Fisher or some other company who could 
>provide free samples.  It will be interesting to see peoples
testimonials
>on using these.
>
>There was Histonet discussion on these sponges way back in time - it
may
>pay to do a search for those messages in Histonet Archives.


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------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Thu, 8 Apr 2004 14:45:42 -0400 
From: "Rizo, Christian" 
Subject: [Histonet] Thermo Shandon automatic stainer
To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Message-ID:
	
<3F8707A1ADC19C4FA84BC95B51CEF560094BA0EB@chi2kms03.columbuschildrens.net>
	
Content-Type: text/plain

Hi everybody,

 

Can anybody share to me their experiences with a Thermo Shandon Automatic
Stainer?

 

We are trying to purchase one with a good deal.

 

Thanks for your help.

 

Chris

 

Christian M. Rizo MBA, HTL (ASCP)

Manager, Anatomic Pathology

Childrens Hospital

700 Childrens Drive

Columbus, Ohio 43205

614.722.5465

RizoC@chi.osu.edu

 

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------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Thu, 8 Apr 2004 14:52:46 -0400 
From: Stacy McLaughlin 
Subject: RE: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing
To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Message-ID:
	<3D502BBF5356D31184650090275B750D0346C74D@mail.cooley-dickinson.org>
Content-Type: text/plain

Can't we all just have our fruit juice in a glass? :)

-----Original Message-----
From: Smith, Allen [mailto:asmith@mail.barry.edu] 
Sent: Thursday, April 08, 2004 1:32 PM
To: Marshall Terry Dr, Consultant Histopathologist
Cc: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Subject: RE: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing


    If an object is under water and the air pressure above the water is
reduced, the total pressure on the object is reduced.  If the object is only
17 feet down (1/2 Atm water pressure plus 1 Atm air pressure), halving the
air pressure above it reduces the total pressure by 33% (1 Atm instead of 1
1/2 Atm).  If the air pressure above it is reduced by 97% (to 0.03 Atm), the
water boils at room temperature! 

    If you seal the bag of fruit at normal atmospheric pressure, put the bag
17 feet underwater, and reduce the air pressure above by 50%, the fruit does
not release juice because the total pressure (1 Atm) is still as high as
when it was sealed.  However, if you reduce the air pressure by 95%, the
total pressure on the fruit will be 0.55 Atm.  If you reduce the pressure to
0.55 Atm suddenly, air dissolved in the fruit juice will rupture the fruit
and juice will leak out.  If you reduce the pressure slowly to 0.55 Atm, the
air will diffuse out without rupturing the fruit.

    If you slowly reduce the pressure on the fruit to 0.03 Atm, the water
will diffuse out slowly, and you will have intact dehydrated fruit.  If you
reduce the pressure on the fruit 0.03 Atm suddenly, the rapid boiling of the
juice will rupture the fruit and some juice will leak out before it, too,
boils.

Allen A. Smith, Ph.D.
Professor of Anatomy
School of Graduate Medical Sciences 
Barry University 
Miami Shores, FL
(also PADI divemaster)

-----Original Message-----
From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
[mailto:histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu] On Behalf Of Marshall
Terry Dr,Consultant Histopathologist
Sent: Thursday, April 08, 2004 11:41 AM
To: Kemlo Rogerson; Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Subject: RE: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing


Kemlo comes back (well he would):

"But that's cos the air is trying to escape to equilibrate the outside
reduction in air pressure. If the airplane was under water and had no air in
it and the air pressure was reduced on top of the water then it would have
no effect on the airplane, would it?"

Any explanations as to what this means to me please.

He continues:

"Similarly the fruit in the bag is not under water, is it? 
Put the fruit under water in the bag and then reduce the pressure above the
water, bet no juice comes out of the fruit except if there is trapped air
and that forces some out as it exits."

No, the fruit in the bag is not under water, but soon it is under fruit
juice. The first thing that happens when you apply vacuum is that the air
goes, then the fruit juice exits the fruit. However, there is a difference
in the two systems, in that the bag in the vacuum press collapses. The
retort hopefully does not. Would this make a difference? My capacity to
conceive some of these concepts is quite paltry.

"Bet you $10".

I don't do bets or dollars.

Someone put a car sponge in a VIP and stop it at the appropriate time would
you?

 Terry L (wishing I'd kept my mouth shut) Marshall

Dr Terry L  Marshall, B.A.(Law), M.B.,Ch.B.,F.R.C.Path  Consultant
Pathologist  Rotherham General Hospital  South Yorkshire  England
        terry.marshall@rothgen.nhs.uk

-----Original Message-----
From: Kemlo Rogerson [mailto:kemlo@tiscali.co.uk]
Sent: 08 April 2004 16:14
To: Marshall Terry Dr, Consultant Histopathologist;
Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Subject: RE: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing



Bet you $10

Mr Kemlo Rogerson MSc DMS MIBiol CBiol FIBMS
Tel: 0208 970 8414
Mob: 07830 196072 
Mobile E-Mail kemlorogerson@3mail.com                     
FAX & Answer Phone 0871 242 8094
E-mail Accounts:  
             kemlo@tiscali.co.uk or 
             kemlo1@btinternet.com 
Disclaimer: The information contained in this message and/or any
attachments(s) may be of a private and confidential nature, and is intended
solely for the attention of the addressee. If you have received this message
in error or feel you should not have been the intended recipient, please
return it and any attachments to the sender immediately. All messages
relating to this communication should then be deleted from your system.
Unauthorised usage, copying, disclosure or alteration of this message and/or
attachment(s) is strictly prohibited. Barking, Havering and Redbridge
Hospitals NHS Trust will not be held responsible for any direct or indirect
damages which may arise from alteration of this message or any
attachment(s), by a third party or resulting from the transmission of a
virus.
 
 
 
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
[mailto:histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu] On Behalf Of Marshall
Terry Dr,Consultant Histopathologist
Sent: 08 April 2004 13:25
To: Kemlo Rogerson; Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Subject: RE: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing

When you see these "action thrillers" in airplanes, and a
bullet/bomb/whatever makes a hole in the fuselage, everything rushes to the
hole, not just the air. I can't envisage this process of sucking only the
air or "surface air bubbles" and leaving a soggy sponge replete with its
load. Under a vacuum, surely the sponge will collapse as the contained
liquid runs out towards the exit. If you apply vacuum to a plastic bag
containing fruit, the juice comes out, and this forms the basis of a vacuum
press, one of which I possess.

So there.


Dr Terry L Marshall, B.A.(Law), M.B.,Ch.B.,F.R.C.Path  Consultant
Pathologist  Rotherham General Hospital  South Yorkshire  England
        terry.marshall@rothgen.nhs.uk

-----Original Message-----
From: Kemlo Rogerson [mailto:kemlo@tiscali.co.uk]
Sent: 07 April 2004 16:48
To: Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Subject: RE: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing


I thought vacuum processing only 'sucked away' air. I mean if you reduce the
air pressure above the fluids then that reduces pressure within the tissue
that was preventing air escaping (as it has a positive pressure). I suppose
if you reduce the Saturated Vapour Pressure of a solvent then that would
cause more solvent to vapourise but wouldn't that be from the surface of the
solvent rather than within the tissue? 

Mr Kemlo Rogerson MSc DMS MIBiol CBiol FIBMS
Tel: 0208 970 8414
Mob: 07830 196072 
Mobile E-Mail kemlorogerson@3mail.com                     
FAX & Answer Phone 0871 242 8094
E-mail Accounts:  
             kemlo@tiscali.co.uk or 
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-----Original Message-----
From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
[mailto:histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu] On Behalf Of Marshall
Terry Dr,Consultant Histopathologist
Sent: 06 April 2004 16:21
To: Steven E. Slap; Gayle Callis; Gudrun Lang;
Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Subject: RE: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing

OK. 200 ml. of liquid retained, with 100 blocks.
However, with a vacuum processor, is that not all "sucked away"?

BTW, should it sound otherwise, I hate the things (but am stuck with them).

Dr Terry L Marshall, B.A.(Law), M.B.,Ch.B.,F.R.C.Path  Consultant
Pathologist  Rotherham General Hospital  South Yorkshire  England
        terry.marshall@rothgen.nhs.uk

-----Original Message-----
From: Steven E. Slap [mailto:siksik03@comcast.net]
Sent: 06 April 2004 16:14
To: Gayle Callis; Gudrun Lang; Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Subject: Re: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing


Hi HistoNetters

I agree with Gayle, and the other posters who pointed out that 
sponges carry over 1ml of fluid per sponge (so, with 100 cassettes, 
200 sponges, that's a lot of carryover).

I have had a lot of success with the biopsy cassettes which Gayle 
refers to, both in microwaves and in conventional tissue processors. 
You can request samples from Lab Storage Systems in St. Louis by 
phone at (800) 345-4167 or by e-mailing Rita Lovshe at 
rcl@labstore.com.

best regards,
Steven Slap

At 10:20 AM -0700 4/1/04, Gayle Callis wrote:
>To: "Gudrun Lang" ,
Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
>From: Gayle Callis 
>Cc:
>Subject: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing
>
>Gudrun,
>
>We no longer use sponges, prefer to place tissues in tissue embedding
bags
>(Fisher) which look like tea bags or the little nylon bags (not as easy
to
>handle, but thinner than sponges) and a tidge stiffer than tea bags.
>Sponges can cause artifacts in your tissues, looking like triangular
holes
>in section.  This was published by Freida Carson in Journal of
>Histotechnology, 1980's.  Using tea bags may not be as fast during 
>embedding, but speed there is a trade off for having to reprocess
important
>tissue samples, ho hum tedious and time consuming while patient waits.
>
>You analysis of problem sound correct with a poor exchange of solvents
>through sponges. If you pack cassettes super tight in basket/cassette 
>holder inside processor you can impede solvent flow or if sponges are 
>crammed too tight agaist tissue then lid smashed down on tissue/sponge 
>sandwich - this is like having too thick a tissue in a cassette.
>
>There are some clever biopsy cassettes with a folding, fine mesh
inserts
>fitting inside a cassette.  These may be worth a try to avoid sponges.
I
>think they are available through Fisher or some other company who could
>provide free samples.  It will be interesting to see peoples
testimonials
>on using these.
>
>There was Histonet discussion on these sponges way back in time - it
may
>pay to do a search for those messages in Histonet Archives.


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------------------------------

Message: 8
Date: Thu, 08 Apr 2004 14:58:36 -0400
From: DDittus787@aol.com
Subject: Re: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing
To: Stacy_McLaughlin@cooley-dickinson.org,
	histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Message-ID: <2F934444.658092DE.0A1F969F@aol.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1

owwwwwwwwwwwwwww

my head hurts, stop using sponges pleaseeeeeeeeee.

just a little humor this was getting a bit intense.
                     Dana



------------------------------

Message: 9
Date: Thu, 8 Apr 2004 11:58:49 -0700 
From: "Barlow, Gillian" 
Subject: [Histonet] Antigen retrieval for heart tissues?
To: 'Histonet' 
Message-ID:
	<3CFAA0108952D111A5BF00805FA6FB0F0794750E@PEDSNTAS.csmc.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dear Histonetters

Does anyone out there know what (if any) antigen retrieval is necessary for
the following antibodies in sections of paraffin-fixed, formalin-embedded
adult mouse heart:
- Cx43
- alpha-actinin
- beta-catenin

Many thanks
Gillian

Gillian M. Barlow, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow
Laboratory of Julie Korenberg, PhD, MD
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Davis Bldg, Lab 2007
110 George Burns Rd
Los Angeles, CA 90048

Phone: (310) 423 7650
Fax: (310) 423 0302

------------------------------

Message: 10
Date: Thu, 08 Apr 2004 15:47:00 -0400
From: "Fred Underwood" 
Subject: [BULK] - Re: [Histonet] Sponge problems in processing
To: 
Message-ID: 
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII

It's best to follow the lead of Elaine Benes and determine just which
specimens are sponge worthy.

>>>  04/08/04 02:58PM >>>
owwwwwwwwwwwwwww

my head hurts, stop using sponges pleaseeeeeeeeee.

just a little humor this was getting a bit intense.
                     Dana

_______________________________________________
Histonet mailing list
Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu 
http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet



------------------------------

Message: 11
Date: Thu, 08 Apr 2004 17:18:28 -0400
From: "Dave Johnson" 
Subject: [Histonet] Histology opening in S CA.
To: Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Message-ID: 
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed

Attention Histonet!,

New Histology Lab in Southern Califonia has job opening for part time or 
fulltime histology technician.   Duties include all applications for 
operating paraffin histology laboratory.   Laboratory is processing 
specimens for Dermatology Practice.  Please send your resume to the 
attention of Jane Litz, Administrator Manager, Fax: 760-724-9929.  Candidate

needed to fill position immediately. >


Thanks

>Rudy Gutierrez
>Pacific Southwest Lab Equipment Inc.
>Product and Sales Division
>Main: 760-295-1842
>Cellular: 760-525-9071
>

_________________________________________________________________
Limited-time offer: Fast, reliable MSN 9 Dial-up Internet access FREE for 2 
months! 
http://join.msn.com/?page=dept/dialup&pgmarket=en-us&ST=1/go/onm00200361ave/
direct/01/




------------------------------

Message: 12
Date: Thu, 08 Apr 2004 17:19:03 -0500
From: Amos Brooks 
Subject: [Histonet] Re: Histonet Digest, Vol 5, Issue 11
To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Message-ID: <6.0.0.22.0.20040408170800.01b704e8@pop.earthlink.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed

Linda,
         Sorry to say there's no such thing. VEGF, despite any 
specifications, just doesn't work properly. We've tried at least 4 
different vendors with hardly any success. Either it didn't label at all, 
labeled in all the wrong places, or the negative control looked the same as 
the test tissue. Check the controls closely if you try this. It's just not 
a reliable antibody.
Regards,
Amos Brooks

At 09:20 AM 4/8/2004, you wrote:
>Message: 2
>Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 13:00:57 -0500
>From: "Sebree Linda A." 
>Subject: [Histonet] VEGF antibody
>To: "Histonet (E-mail)" 
>Message-ID:
>

>Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>Hi again,
>
>Wondering if anyone can recommend a good, reliable VEGF (vascular 
>endothelial growth factor) antibody?  If you've run yours on a Ventana 
>instrument, so much the better.
>
>Thanks for the help,
>
>Linda A. Sebree
>University of Wisconsin Hospital & Clinics
>IHC/ISH Clinical & Research Laboratory
>DM223-VA
>600 Highland Ave.
>Madison, WI 53792
>(608)265-6596
>FAX:  (608)262-7174





------------------------------

Message: 13
Date: Thu, 8 Apr 2004 23:34:01 +0200
From: "Gudrun Lang" 
Subject: [Histonet] Re: semithin-ultrathin - thank you
To: "Histonetliste" 
Message-ID: <005f01c41db1$35901b30$eeeea8c0@SERVER>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="iso-8859-1"

Thank you for your explanations about the thickness of sections.
Gudrun Lang, Austria

PS.: I read the sponge-debate with interest.

----- Original Message -----
From: "David Kelly, M.D." 
To: "'Gudrun Lang'" 
Sent: Thursday, April 08, 2004 12:04 AM
Subject: RE: [Histonet] semithin-ultrathin


> Tim Morken's description of these terms is accurate.  If you need a
> reference, the book is old and probably out of print but still an
excellent
> introduction to electron microscopy.  Appropriately, it is entitled "An
> Introduction to Diagnostic Electron Microscopy," by Bruce Mackay
> (Appleton-Century-Crofts, New York, 1981).  See Chapter 2 Technical
> Procedures, by Paul S. Baur and Bruce Mackay, p 40 and  Chapter 3
> Preparation and Interpretation of Semithin Sections, by Willard A. Burns,
pp
> 47-48.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Gudrun Lang [mailto:gudrun.lang@aon.at]
> Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2004 2:06 PM
> To: Histonetliste
> Subject: [Histonet] semithin-ultrathin
>
>
> Hi,
> I've searched in the internet for a list that explains the thickness of
> semi-, ultra-, thin, thick sections. But I failed. My knowledge is only
> approximately.
> Perhaps someone can help me?
> Gudrun Lang
> _______________________________________________
> Histonet mailing list
> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet
>
>




------------------------------

Message: 14
Date: Thu, 08 Apr 2004 15:34:41 -0600
From: Gayle Callis 
Subject: [Histonet] Interesting eosinophilic artifacts
To: Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20040408153441.00bc20c0@gemini.msu.montana.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

After all my years doing histo work, I have one H&E tissue section, mouse
lung which shows crystalline shaped eosinophilic artifacts.  I stained
other lung sections from this experiment and murine reproductive tract,
placenta at the same time.  These have no artifacts. Some of the crystals
actually look ingested by macrophages.  

If anyone is interested, I will be happy to drop photo privately.  I have
never seen artifacts like these.  

Baffled in Montana! 




Gayle Callis
MT,HT,HTL(ASCP)
Research Histopathology Supervisor
Veterinary Molecular Biology 
Montana State University - Bozeman
PO Box 173610
Bozeman MT 59717-3610
406 994-6367 (lab with voice mail)
406 994-4303 (FAX)





------------------------------

Message: 15
Date: Thu, 08 Apr 2004 15:48:23 -0600
From: Gayle Callis 
Subject: [Histonet] Eosinophilic artifacts posted in Histonet gallery
To: Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20040408154823.00ba3030@gemini.msu.montana.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Photo of eosinophilic crystalline structures to be posted in Histonet
gallery. 
Gayle Callis
MT,HT,HTL(ASCP)
Research Histopathology Supervisor
Veterinary Molecular Biology 
Montana State University - Bozeman
PO Box 173610
Bozeman MT 59717-3610
406 994-6367 (lab with voice mail)
406 994-4303 (FAX)





------------------------------

Message: 16
Date: Thu, 8 Apr 2004 15:48:28 -0600
From: "Patsy Ruegg" 
Subject: RE: [Histonet] Re: Histonet Digest, Vol 5, Issue 11
To: "Amos Brooks" ,
	
Message-ID: 
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="US-ASCII"

Amos I had the same experience as you with VEGF's until I switched to
monoclonal Vegf from Santa Cruz, it now appears very specific and reliable
to me.  I use pepsin or proteinase K digestion and stay away from HIER.
Patsy

-----Original Message-----
From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
[mailto:histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu]On Behalf Of Amos
Brooks
Sent: Thursday, April 08, 2004 4:19 PM
To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Subject: [Histonet] Re: Histonet Digest, Vol 5, Issue 11


Linda,
         Sorry to say there's no such thing. VEGF, despite any
specifications, just doesn't work properly. We've tried at least 4
different vendors with hardly any success. Either it didn't label at all,
labeled in all the wrong places, or the negative control looked the same as
the test tissue. Check the controls closely if you try this. It's just not
a reliable antibody.
Regards,
Amos Brooks

At 09:20 AM 4/8/2004, you wrote:
>Message: 2
>Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 13:00:57 -0500
>From: "Sebree Linda A." 
>Subject: [Histonet] VEGF antibody
>To: "Histonet (E-mail)" 
>Message-ID:
>

>Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>Hi again,
>
>Wondering if anyone can recommend a good, reliable VEGF (vascular
>endothelial growth factor) antibody?  If you've run yours on a Ventana
>instrument, so much the better.
>
>Thanks for the help,
>
>Linda A. Sebree
>University of Wisconsin Hospital & Clinics
>IHC/ISH Clinical & Research Laboratory
>DM223-VA
>600 Highland Ave.
>Madison, WI 53792
>(608)265-6596
>FAX:  (608)262-7174



_______________________________________________
Histonet mailing list
Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet




------------------------------

Message: 17
Date: Thu, 08 Apr 2004 17:54:48 -0400
From: Luis Chiriboga 
Subject: RE: [Histonet] Re: Histonet Digest, Vol 5, Issue 11
To: Amos Brooks ,
	histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu, 	la.sebree@hosp.wisc.edu
Message-ID: 
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII

I agree strongly with Amos and have basically gotten the same results.  it's
a pain in the neck (and I don't mean from looking in the scope).  I have run
a couple, from different manufacturers, tried all the usual tricks(automated
and not) and none of them performed consistently. I figured I would just
pick one and stick with and just go the brute force approach,  use it until
I get results that I can live with.  Hope this helps, regards
luis



-----Original Message-----
From: histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
[mailto:histonet-bounces@lists.utsouthwestern.edu]On Behalf Of Amos
Brooks
Sent: Thursday, April 08, 2004 6:19 PM
To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Subject: [Histonet] Re: Histonet Digest, Vol 5, Issue 11


Linda,
         Sorry to say there's no such thing. VEGF, despite any
specifications, just doesn't work properly. We've tried at least 4
different vendors with hardly any success. Either it didn't label at all,
labeled in all the wrong places, or the negative control looked the same as
the test tissue. Check the controls closely if you try this. It's just not
a reliable antibody.
Regards,
Amos Brooks

At 09:20 AM 4/8/2004, you wrote:
>Message: 2
>Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 13:00:57 -0500
>From: "Sebree Linda A." 
>Subject: [Histonet] VEGF antibody
>To: "Histonet (E-mail)" 
>Message-ID:
>

>Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>Hi again,
>
>Wondering if anyone can recommend a good, reliable VEGF (vascular
>endothelial growth factor) antibody?  If you've run yours on a Ventana
>instrument, so much the better.
>
>Thanks for the help,
>
>Linda A. Sebree
>University of Wisconsin Hospital & Clinics
>IHC/ISH Clinical & Research Laboratory
>DM223-VA
>600 Highland Ave.
>Madison, WI 53792
>(608)265-6596
>FAX:  (608)262-7174



_______________________________________________
Histonet mailing list
Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet




------------------------------

Message: 18
Date: Thu, 08 Apr 2004 15:07:11 -0700
From: Patti Loykasek 
Subject: Re: [Histonet] Re: Histonet Digest, Vol 5, Issue 11
To: histonet 
Message-ID: 
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"

Amos & all - I couldn't have said it better myself. The only difference is
that we have tried >6 clones. Be very careful of the staining, read up on
the expected positivity, and pick your positive controls carefully.

Patti Loykasek


> Linda,
>        Sorry to say there's no such thing. VEGF, despite any
> specifications, just doesn't work properly. We've tried at least 4
> different vendors with hardly any success. Either it didn't label at all,
> labeled in all the wrong places, or the negative control looked the same
as
> the test tissue. Check the controls closely if you try this. It's just not
> a reliable antibody.
> Regards,
> Amos Brooks
> 
> At 09:20 AM 4/8/2004, you wrote:
>> Message: 2
>> Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 13:00:57 -0500
>> From: "Sebree Linda A." 
>> Subject: [Histonet] VEGF antibody
>> To: "Histonet (E-mail)" 
>> Message-ID:
>>

>> Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"
>> 
>> Hi again,
>> 
>> Wondering if anyone can recommend a good, reliable VEGF (vascular
>> endothelial growth factor) antibody?  If you've run yours on a Ventana
>> instrument, so much the better.
>> 
>> Thanks for the help,
>> 
>> Linda A. Sebree
>> University of Wisconsin Hospital & Clinics
>> IHC/ISH Clinical & Research Laboratory
>> DM223-VA
>> 600 Highland Ave.
>> Madison, WI 53792
>> (608)265-6596
>> FAX:  (608)262-7174
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Histonet mailing list
> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet




------------------------------

Message: 19
Date: Thu, 08 Apr 2004 18:20:18 -0400
From: gsp26@drexel.edu
Subject: [Histonet] caspase 3 and transferrin receptor for rats
To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Message-ID: <1d855f81d8788c.1d8788c1d855f8@drexel.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii


Has anyone used caspase 3 IHC on rat paraffin embedded tissue. the same
question for transferrin receptor IHC. Please advise!!





------------------------------

Message: 20
Date: Thu, 8 Apr 2004 18:26:08 -0400 
From: "Favara, Cynthia (NIH/NIAID)" 
Subject: RE: [Histonet] caspase 3 and transferrin receptor for rats
To: "'gsp26@drexel.edu'" ,
	histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Message-ID:
	
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="iso-8859-1"

I have done cleaved caspase 3 on FFPE mouse tissue  Source: Cell Signaling
#9961

c

Cynthia Favara
NIAID/NIH/RML/LPVD
903 South 4th Street
Hamilton, MT 59840
406-363-9317


-----Original Message-----
From: gsp26@drexel.edu [mailto:gsp26@drexel.edu]
Sent: Thursday, April 08, 2004 4:20 PM
To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Subject: [Histonet] caspase 3 and transferrin receptor for rats



Has anyone used caspase 3 IHC on rat paraffin embedded tissue. the same
question for transferrin receptor IHC. Please advise!!



_______________________________________________
Histonet mailing list
Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet



------------------------------

Message: 21
Date: Thu, 8 Apr 2004 15:34:01 -0700 
From: "Dixon, Leslie E." 
Subject: [Histonet] Whipf's polychrome
To: Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
Message-ID:
	
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="iso-8859-1"

Good afternoon,

I am curious if anyone has the procedure for Whipf's polychrome?

Thanks in advance,
Leslie



------------------------------

Message: 22
Date: Fri, 9 Apr 2004 18:51:44 -0400
From: "Derek & Lynda Leopold" 
Subject: [Histonet] bcl-2 on Nexes
To: 
Message-ID: <000801c41e85$3bc3fc40$3643fea9@leopold>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="iso-8859-1"

Hi All,
We're having some trouble getting our tonsil control to come up for bcl-2.
After searching the archives and asking around, we are going to try citrate
buffer (Declere) and a hot steamer for 1 hour.  We've got the Nexes IHC.
Anyone else have any tips for us?
Can anyone comment on the need/non-need for DAB?
Thanks
Lynda Leopold

------------------------------

Message: 23
Date: Thu, 8 Apr 2004 18:45:23 EDT
From: Linresearch@aol.com
Subject: [Histonet] Perfusion System
To: histonet@pathology.swmed.edu
Message-ID: 
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"

Hello,
Anyone with experience using the Perfusio 1 System from MyNeuroLab,
Could you give me feedback on the sytem?
If someone has a better system, could you let me know?
Lin


------------------------------

Message: 24
Date: Thu, 8 Apr 2004 19:48:23 -0400
From: Sharon Cooperman 
Subject: [Histonet] ALAS
To: histonet@pathology.swmed.edu
Message-ID: 
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" ; format="flowed"

Hi,

Does anyone know of a source for antisera to aminolevulinic acid synthase?

Thanks,
Sharon
-- 
Sharon Cooperman        	     
NIH, NICHD, CBMB                     301.435-7735
Building 18T, room 101               301.402-0078 fax
Bethesda, MD 20892



------------------------------

Message: 25
Date: Thu, 8 Apr 2004 19:51:06 -0400
From: Sharon Cooperman 
Subject: [Histonet] lysosomal markers
To: histonet@pathology.swmed.edu
Message-ID: 
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" ; format="flowed"

Hi,

Does anyone know of an antibody/antiserum to a lysosomal marker such 
as Lamp 1 or Lamp 2 that cross reacts with mouse and works on 
formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue (with or without antigen 
retrieval)?

Thanks,
Sharon
-- 
Sharon Cooperman        	     
NIH, NICHD, CBMB                     301.435-7735
Building 18T, room 101               301.402-0078 fax
Bethesda, MD 20892



------------------------------

Message: 26
Date: Thu, 8 Apr 2004 22:23:23 -0400
From: " Katri Tuomala" 
Subject: Re: [Histonet] heavy - chain deposition desease 
To: " " ,
	
Message-ID: <009901c41dd9$a538fa60$ce989618@hala4.on.cogeco.ca>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="gb2312"

Hi!
Are you working on human or animal tissue? In human renal biopsies most
commonly used technique is probably immunofluorescence on snap frozen
tissue. We use FITC conjugated antibodies from DakoCytomation for heavy
chains IgA, IgG and IgM in addition to C3complement, fibrinogen, kappa &
lambda light chains and albumin. These can be demonstrated also on FFPE
tissue, but the method is more involved and takes more time to develop to
obtain reproducible results. Immunofluorescence is a long standing and a
simple technique to perform...
Katri

Katri Tuomala
Department of Pathology
St.Joseph's Health Care
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
----- Original Message ----- 
From: " " 
To: 
Sent: Thursday, April 08, 2004 10:36 AM
Subject: [Histonet] heavy - chain deposition desease


> Hello,everobody:
>      I am very interested in the diagonosis of heavy-chain deposition
disease.Firstly ,I am going to find out whether there are deposition of
heavy chains  along  tubular and glomerular basement membranes.But I have no
idea about which company's antibodyies are  appropriate.Would anybody be
kind enough to share me with you experieace?
> Thanks a lot.
> Beat Regards!
> Shuqiong Shen
> Research Insititute of Nephrology
> 305 East Zhongshan Road
> Nanjing 210002,P.R.China
>
>
>
>
> ---------------------------------
> Do You Yahoo!?
> TTϷ磬Ϸд󽱣
> _______________________________________________
> Histonet mailing list
> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu
> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet





------------------------------

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End of Histonet Digest, Vol 5, Issue 13
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