RE: Agar and heat

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From:Hewlett Bryan <HEWLETT@HHSC.CA>
To:histonet@pathology.swmed.edu, 'Donna Sitrin' <dsitrin@unipathllc.com>
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Because it's fixed by the processor reagents!

Bryan

> ----------
> From: 	Donna Sitrin[SMTP:dsitrin@unipathllc.com]
> Sent: 	April 12, 2000 6:21 PM
> To: 	histonet@pathology.swmed.edu
> Subject: 	Agar and heat
> 
> 
> I was asked by a curious tech today, the following:
> 
> How come the agar used in the cell blocks does not become liquid again in
> the heated chemicals in the processor.  Why does it keep it's shape?
> 
> We melt agar down in order to use it in making a cell block, and when it
> cools, it solidifies.  Why doesn't it melt and cause the loss of cells
> when it is heated in the processors?  Why does it stay solid?
> 
> Any who would like to, please reply.
> 
> 
> 



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